Department of World Languages and Cultures

Chair: Dr. Leif French (936) 294-1414

Information: (936) 294-1441; ABIV 315; foreignlanguages@shsu.edu

Website: Department of World Languages and Cultures

Foreign language study not only enables communication across languages and cultures but opens doors to insights about different cultures and their diverse perspectives of life. Knowledge of languages and cultures provides exciting opportunities for travel and careers.

Highlights

All languages

  • Cultural celebrations
  • Foreign film festivals
  • Study Abroad

French

  • National French Week: November
  • French Film Club

German

  • Oktoberfest: October
  • German Film Club

Spanish

  • Grito de Dolores: September
  • Día de la Raza: October
  • Día de los Muertos: November
  • Navidad: December
  • Semana Santa: spring

Suggested Minors

SHSU offers a wide range of courses and area studies particularly applicable to language study minors for individual interests and career goals, especially in Business, Criminal Justice, Education, Health Professions, History, International Business, Journalism, Mass Media, Music, and Political Science.

Career Opportunities

Professionals with competence in one or more foreign languages are needed in almost all professions:

  • agriculture
  • business
  • computer science
  • criminology
  • education
  • the fine arts
  • government service
  • industry
  • international business
  • medicine
  • mass media
  • science
  • related areas

The Department of World Languages and Cultures prepares students for professions requiring a foreign language as a major skill, for graduate school and functions as a service area in career preparation.

Department Specific Requirements

A major in Spanish requires a total of 36 hours of coursework. These include:

Required Courses
SPAN 1411Elementary Spanish I4
SPAN 1412Elementary Spanish II4
SPAN 2311Intermediate Spanish I3
SPAN 2312Intermediate Spanish II3
Advanced courses (12 hours of which must be taken in residence.)22
Total Hours36

Foreign language majors and language students in the teacher certification program must take at least one history or geography course dealing with the country or countries whose language they are studying in order to promote interdisciplinary and international education. Students are required to have a 3.0 or the equivalent in their advanced major/minor teaching areas prior to being permitted to take the certification examinations.

Student Organizations and Activities

The Foreign Languages Program sponsors many activities designed to enhance the language student’s linguistic and cultural experiences at Sam Houston State University.

The Foreign Languages Program sponsors Pi Delta Phi, the national French honor society and Sigma Delta Pi, the national Spanish honor society. Students also may participate in the Arabic, ASL, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish Clubs.

Internships and Study Abroad

Students have the opportunity to study abroad. Students and faculty come together as a community of scholars to study language and different aspects of culture and interact with the community during the summer. SHSU offers courses in countries like Costa Rica, France, Mexico, Qatar, Spain, and Switzerland. Students may take intermediate and advanced courses and courses at all levels in not only language but in such disciplines as Art, Business, Family & Consumer Sciences and Agriculture.

Full semester study abroad experiences in many target-language areas are available through SHSU agreements with universities throughout the world; for more information visit International Programs.

Various credit-bearing internships are also available; for more information visit the Department of World Languages.

Scholarships

Scholarships: Students in languages may apply for the Foreign Languages Scholarship, for the Mozelle Powell Spanish Scholarship, and/or for the Seola Arnaud & R.V. Edwards, Jr. Endowed French Scholarship. For more information, apply on line at Scholar X and contact the Department of World Languages and Cultures office or visit Foreign Languages. Information on University scholarships may be obtained at the Office of Academic Scholarships or by telephone (936) 294-1672.

Arabic

ARAB 1411. Elementary Arabic I. 4 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: ARB 131); For students with no previous instruction in Arabic. Introduction to the Arabic alphabet, pronunciation, vocabulary and basic language codes, stressing an oral approach to the language with emphasis on conversation and oral drill.

ARAB 1412. Elementary Arabic II. 4 Hours.

A continuation of ARAB 1411. Language codes with more complexity discussed and drilled. Stress on aural and oral skills.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ARAB 1411 or equivalent.

ARAB 2311. Intermediate Arabic I. 3 Hours.

A continuation of ARAB 1412, adding more complex structures as a basis for reading and aural comprehension as well as for oral communication.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ARAB 1412 or equivalent.

ARAB 2312. Intermediate Arabic II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of ARAB 2311. Special emphasis on practical needs for communication. Short cultural reading passages. More complex grammar. Particular emphasis on roots of Arabic words.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ARAB 2311 or equivalent.

ARAB 3380. The Contemporary Arab World. 3 Hours.

Taught in the Arabic language for additional skill development in listening, speaking, reading and writing, the course emphasizes the fifth skill: cultural knowledge with insights and perspective via the viewpoint and linguistic expression of the native Arabic speaker. Introduces and describes the linguistic and cultural ramifications of the historical, political, social and economic situations in Arab countries with some analysis comparison among Arabic countries. An emphasis on gender issues, progress and reforms, the rise of fundamentalisms and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

ARAB 4075. Individual Readings in Arabic. 1-3 Hours.

This course is designed for advanced students to engage in independent study of an area of interest in Arabic Studies. Variable Credit (1-3).

ARAB 4370. Smnr Sel Tpcs in Arabic Cultur. 3 Hours.

(Prior SH course id: ARB 470); This course is an in-depth study of a selected topic. The topic to be explored will change from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit as the content varies.
Prerequisite: Advanced standing in Arabic or consent of instructor.

Foreign Languages

FOLG 1411. Beginning Foreign Language I. 4 Hours.

(Prior SH course id: FL 141); First semester language is the first half of an elementary course on spoken and written language designed for beginning students.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better is required to move on to FOLG 1412.

FOLG 1412. Beginning Foreign Language II. 4 Hours.

(Prior SH course id: FL 142); Second semester language is an elementary course on spoken and written language designed for students that have some basic language knowledge, but want to improve their level in speaking, listening, writing and reading. This course can also expand on cultural knowledge.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FOLG 1411 or the equivalent.

FOLG 2311. Intermediate Foreign Language. 3 Hours.

Third semester language emphasizes oral, listening, writing and reading skills. The class will include oral drills on pronunciation, as well as listening comprehension exercises. Additional activities will consist of reading exercises to improve intonation, pronunciation with the objective of making students comfortable and confident in speaking and writing correctly.
Prerequisite: FOLG 1411 and FOLG 1412 with a grade of C or higher.

FOLG 2312. Intermed Foreign Language II. 3 Hours.

Fourth semester language is a middle course on spoken and written language designed for students that have some basic language knowledge, but want to improve their level in speaking, listening, writing and reading. This course can also expand on cultural knowledge.
Prerequisite: FOLG 1411, FOLG 1412, and FOLG 2311 with a grade of C or higher.

FOLG 2361. Intro-American Sign Language. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for the individual intermediate-level student who may need study of a particular era, genre, or author. Enrollment in this course is restricted and approval of such must be obtained from the department chair. The course may be repeated for credit as content varies.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in FOLG 2312 or the equivalent.

FOLG 3061. Individual Readings. 1-3 Hours.

This course is designed for the individual advanced-level student who may need study of a particular era, genre, or author. Enrollment in this course is restricted and approval of such must be obtained from the department chair. The course may be repeated for credit as content varies.

FOLG 4363. HOW LANGUAGES ARE LEARNED: CONCEPTS & METHODS. 3 Hours.

Methods of Teaching Secondary Foreign Languages is designed as a methods course in second language acquisition. This course will present information and materials for Second Language teachers that will enhance their teaching. Currently, SHSU does not offer this course, either in the Department of Foreign Languages or in the College of Education.

French

FREN 1411. Elementary French. 4 Hours.

For students who have no previous instruction in French. Introduction to French pronunciation, vocabulary, and basic language codes stressing an oral approach to the language with special emphasis on conversation and oral drill. Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment. For non-native speakers of French. Native speakers should take the CLEP or register for FREN 2312.

FREN 1412. Elementary French. 4 Hours.

This course is a continuation of FREN 1411. Language codes with more complexity are discussed and drilled. Stress is placed on aural and oral skills. Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment. For non-native speakers of French. Native French speakers should take the CLEP or register for FREN 2312.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 1411 or equivalent.

FREN 2311. Intermediate French I. 3 Hours.

Readings of medium difficulty are used as a basis for reading and aural comprehension as well as for oral communication. For non-native speakers of French. Native French speakers should take the CLEP or register for FREN 2312.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 1412 or equivalent.

FREN 2312. Intermediate French II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of FREN 2311 with special emphasis on practical needs for communication.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 2311 or equivalent.

FREN 3364. Survey Of French Literature. 3 Hours.

A detailed study of the various schools and periods of literature from the 16th century to modern times. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 2312 or equivalent.

FREN 3365. French Grammar And Stylistics. 3 Hours.

A continuing emphasis on fluent usage of oral and written French. Intensive study of selected written work with the purpose of mastering mid-level proficiency skills.
Prerequisite: FREN 1411, FREN 1412, FREN 2311 and FREN 2312 with a grade of C or higher.

FREN 3367. Fren Phonetics & Conversation. 3 Hours.

Basic theory of French pronunciation and intonation. With ample opportunity for drill, students achieve an intermediate level of oral proficiency.
Prerequisite: FREN 1411, FREN 1412, FREN 2311 and FREN 2312 with a grade of C or higher.

FREN 3380. French Culture & Civilization. 3 Hours.

A course to portray the overall picture of the role played by French culture and civilization throughout the world. This course will provide cultural background for French majors or minors. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 1411, FREN 1412, FREN 2311 and FREN 2312 with a grade of C or higher.

FREN 4075. Individual French Readings. 1-6 Hours.

This course is designed for the individual student who may need study of a particular era or genre or author. Enrollment in this course is restricted and approval for such must be obtained from the Program Coordinator. The course may be repeated for credit as content varies. Variable Credit (1-3).
Prerequisite: Advanced standing in French or consent of instructor and department chair.

FREN 4364. Mod French Usage & Conversatn. 3 Hours.

A useful course for all levels, including those seeking oral proficiency. Emphasis is placed on extemporaneous speech and conversation dealing with modern topics. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 1411, FREN 1412, FREN 2311 and FREN 2312 with a grade of C or higher.

FREN 4370. Seminar in Selected Topics of Literacy, Language, and Civilization. 3 Hours.

This course will be an in-depth study of a selected topic by which French majors and minors, tracking specific skills, may acquire the necessary knowledge of francophone culture and/or the ability to speak, read, and write the French language at an advanced level. The topic to be explored will change from semester to semester. The course may be repeated for credit as the content vaires.
Prerequisite: FREN 1411, FREN 1412, FREN 2311 and FREN 2312 with a grade of C or higher.

FREN 4377. French for Business Comm. 3 Hours.

Specialized focus on vocabulary, expressions and language used in oral and written business communication in French. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 1411, FREN 1412, FREN 2311 and FREN 2312 with a grade of C or higher.

FREN 4379. Francophone Literature. 3 Hours.

A survey of the major topics in Francophone literatures and film from the French-speaking regions of the world. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 1411, FREN 1412, FREN 2311 and FREN 2312 with a grade of C or higher.

German

GERM 1411. Elementary German. 4 Hours.

For students who have had no previous instruction in German. The work includes vocabulary acquisition, international cultural components, pronunciation, drills, sentence formation, and everyday conversation leading to proficiency. Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment.

GERM 1412. Elementary German. 4 Hours.

A continuation of GERM 1411 with more speaking and writing toward advancing proficiency. Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 1411 or equivalent.

GERM 2311. Intermediate German I. 3 Hours.

A continuation of GERM 1412 with emphasis on written and oral skills.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 1412 or equivalent.

GERM 2312. Intermediate German II. 3 Hours.

A continuing emphasis on fluent usage of oral and written German. Intensive study of selected written work with the purpose of mastering midlevel proficiency skills.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 2311 or equivalent.

GERM 2364. Multicultures Of Amer-German. 3 Hours.

A survey course designed to increase an awareness of Central- European culture in America with particular emphasis on the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries. This course may be conducted in English or German. Credit for this course may be applied to the major or minor only with permission of department chair.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 2312 or equivalent.

GERM 3368. German Media. 3 Hours.

Study of German Media. Focus on conversational, listening, reading, and vocabulary skills. Students will watch German television programs and will read articles from major German magazines and newspapers. Includes a review of German grammar.
Prerequisite: GERM 1411, GERM 1412, GERM 2311 and GERM 2312 with a grade of C or better.

GERM 3380. Modern German Culture. 3 Hours.

An overview of the cultures of German speaking countries (Germany, Austria, and Switzerland) from 1780 to the present.
Prerequisite: GERM 1411, GERM 1412, GERM 2311 and GERM 2312 with a grade of C or better.

GERM 4075. Individual Readings in German. 1-3 Hours.

This course is designed for the individual student who may need study of a particular era, genre, or author. Enrollment in this course is restricted and approval of such must be obtained from the department chair. The course may be repeated for credit as content varies. Variable Credit (1-3).

GERM 4360. Modern German Literature. 3 Hours.

An overview of the literatures of German-speaking countries (Germany, Austria, and Switzerland) from 1770 to the present.
Prerequisite: GERM 1411, GERM 1412, GERM 2311 and GERM 2312 with a grade of C or better.

GERM 4370. Seminar in Sel German Topics. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of a selected topic. The topic to be explored will change from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit as the content varies. Enrollment for this course must be granted by the Department Chair.
Prerequisite: GERM 1411, GERM 1412, GERM 2311 and GERM 2312 with a grade of C or better.

American Sign Language

SGNL 1401. Elementry American Sign Lang I. 4 Hours.

For students who have had no previous instruction in American Sign Language. The work includes vocabulary acquisition, cultural components, drills, sentence formation, and everyday conversation leading to proficiency. Language laboratory periods weekly are required.

SGNL 1402. Elementry American Sign Lng II. 4 Hours.

A continuation of SGNL 1401 with more speaking and writing toward advancing proficiency. Language laboratory periods weekly are required.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SGNL 1401 or equivalent.

SGNL 2311. Intermediate American Sign Language I. 3 Hours.

A continuation of SGNL 1402 with emphasis on more advanced skills.
Prerequisite: SGNL 1401 and SGNL 1402 with a grade of C or better.

SGNL 2312. Intermediate American Sign Language II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of SGNL 2311 with emphasis on fluent usage of American Sign Language. Intensive study with the purpose of mastering mid-level proficiency skills.
Prerequisite: SGNL 1401, SGNL 1402, and SGNL 2311 with a grade of C or better.

Spanish

SPAN 1411. Elementary Spanish I. 4 Hours.

For students who have had no previous instruction in Spanish. Introduction to Spanish pronunciation, vocabulary, and basic language codes stressing an oral approach to the language with special emphasis on conversation and oral drill. Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment. Native Spanish speakers should take the CLEP or register for SPAN 2312.
Prerequisite: For non-native speakers of Spanish.

SPAN 1412. Elementary Spanish II. 4 Hours.

This course is a continuation of SPN 1411. Language codes with more complexity are discussed and drilled. Stress is placed on aural and oral skills. Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment. For non-native speakers of Spanish. Native Spanish speakers should take the CLEP for placement.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 1411 or equivalent.

SPAN 2311. Intermediate Spanish I. 3 Hours.

Readings of medium difficulty are used as a basis for reading and aural comprehension as well as for oral communication. For non-native speakers of Spanish. Native Spanish speakers should take the CLEP for placement.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 1412 or equivalent.

SPAN 2312. Intermediate Spanish II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of SPAN 2311 with special emphasis on practical needs for communication.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 2311 or equivalent.

SPAN 3361. Spanish Grammar & Composition. 3 Hours.

Study of the syntactical and morphological characteristics of the Spanish language with emphasis on developing the ability to write in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 2312, the equivalent of SPAN 2312, or consent of instructor.

SPAN 3362. Survey Of Spanish Literature I. 3 Hours.

A study of the development of the literature of Spain from the Middle Ages to the 18th century. Various eras, genres, and authors are studied.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411, SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 3363. Survey Of Spanish Lit II. 3 Hours.

Will focus on the literature of Spain beginning with the eighteenth century to the present. Masterworks from genres of drama, poetry, and prose will be read, discussed in Spanish and analyzed in written reports.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411, SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 3367. Principles Of Span Linguistics. 3 Hours.

A study of descriptive, applied, and contrastive linguistics.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411, SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 3368. Conversational Spanish I. 3 Hours.

Emphasis is placed on extemporaneous speaking and conversation. Reading materials from Spanish speaking countries will be included as a basis for conversation and composition. This course cannot be taken for credit by native Spanish speakers.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411, SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 3369. Conversational Spanish II. 3 Hours.

Emphasis is placed on extemporaneous speaking and conversation. Reading materials from Spanish speaking countries will be included as a basis for conversation and composition.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411, SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 3374. Intro-Lit Of Spanish America. 3 Hours.

Study of the texts of Spanish-American writers from the Conquest to the present with emphasis given to the historical, cultural, and political factors which influenced their writing. Instruction is in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411, SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 3375. Genres In Spanish American Lit. 3 Hours.

Studies of themes and techniques of outstanding Spanish- American poets, dramatists or novelists.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411, SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 3380. Spanish Culture & Civilization. 3 Hours.

An overview of the culture and civilization of Spain.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411,SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 3381. Spanish Lit for Children. 3 Hours.

This course prepares students to teach Spanish and Spanish-American literature for children, its rhetorical and narrative characteristics, its development, and its symbolism in relation to the needs of the child and the culture. Instruction is conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411,SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 3385. Span-Amer Culture & Civilizatn. 3 Hours.

A study of the culture and civilization of the Spanish-speaking areas of the Americas.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411,SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 4075. Individual Readings in Spanish. 1-6 Hours.

Designed for the individual student who may need to study a particular era, genre, or author. Enrollment in this course is restricted and must be granted by department chair. Variable Credit (1-3).
Prerequisite: Advanced standing in Spanish.

SPAN 4361. Advanced Spanish Grammar. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of the usage of the Spanish language as it relates to creative writing and scholarly reports.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411, SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 4362. History of the Spanish Languag. 3 Hours.

This course outlines the history of the Spanish language over the last two millennia, focusing on the formal development of its phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411, SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312, SPAN 3361 and SPAN 3367 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 4364. Spanish American Prose. 3 Hours.

A study of selected authors, short stories, essays, or novels. Emphasis on themes, techniques, and current literary themes.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411,SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 4365. Pablo Picasso & Spanish Art. 3 Hours.

This course examines the interplay between Spanish culture and Spanish art using Pablo Picasso as a central unifying figure in order to relate past, present, and future aspects of Spanish heritage.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411, SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 4366. Spanish Phonetics. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of the sounds of Spanish. The two essential goals of the course are to discuss the ways in which English and Spanish sounds differ, and to help improve pronunciation of the Spanish language. Advanced Standing in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411,SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312, SPAN 3361 and SPAN 3367 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 4370. Seminar in Selected Topics Literacy, Language, and Civilization. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of a selected topic. The topic to be explored will change from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit as the content varies.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411, SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 4371. Spanish for Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Study of Spanish and Spanish-related issues and topics for Criminal Justice, criminology, law enforcement, and Sociology.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair.

SPAN 4372. Spanish for Business. 3 Hours.

Study of business terminology in Spanish related to banking, accounting, international trade, marketing, management, and finance and of cultural aspects of Latin America and Spain, with practice in speaking, reading and translating business Spanish. Credit 3 hours.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1411,SPAN 1412, SPAN 2311, SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361 with a grade of C or higher.

SPAN 4373. Spanish for Mass Communication. 3 Hours.

Students in this course examine the Spanish language as it relates to radio, television, newspaper, and other media sources in the context of Hispanic culture. The course surveys the history of journalistic genres in Spain, Latin America, and the United States. The course builds language proficiency using a contextualized, content-based approach.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3361.

SPAN 4374. Spanish for Health Professions. 3 Hours.

This course promotes the development of enhanced Spanish-language ability for professionals in the health care industry. The close relationship between language and culture will also foster the heightened awareness of ethnic, gender, and multicultural consciousness.
Prerequisite: SPAN 2312 and SPAN 3361.

Chair: Leif M French

Debra D Andrist, PHD, Professor of Spanish, Department of World Languages and Cultures, PHD, University of Buffalo, Suny; MA, Univ of Utah; AB, Fort Hays State University; AB, Fort Hays State University

Maria Hasler Barker, PHD, Assistant Professor of Spanish, Department of World Languages and Cultures, PHD, Indiana University; MA, Indiana University; BA, Brigham Young University

Shirin E Edwin, PHD, Associate Professor of French, Department of World Languages and Cultures, PHD, Vanderbilt University; MA, Bangalore University; BA, Bangalore University; BA, Bangalore University; BA, Bangalore University

Maria M Feu Lopez, PHD, Assistant Professor of Spanish, Department of World Languages and Cultures, PHD, Univ of Houston-Main; MA, Hood College; BA, Universidad de Barcelona

Leif M French, PHD, Professor and Chair of World Languages and Cultures, Department of World Languages and Cultures, PHD, Universite Laval; MA, Universite Laval; BA, California St Un-Sacramento

Frieda Cecile Koeninger, PHD, Associate Professor of Spanish, Department of World Languages and Cultures, PHD, Univ of Texas At Austin; MA, Universidad de las Americas; BA, Sam Houston State University

Ervin Malakaj, PHD, Assistant Professor of World Languages and Cultures, Department of World Languages and Cultures, PHD, Washington University; MA, Univ of Illinois-Chicago; BA, Univ of Illinois-Chicago

Enrique Mallen, PHD, Professor of Spanish, Department of World Languages and Cultures, PHD, Cornell University; MA, Cornell University; MA, Universidad de Sevilla

Rafael E Saumell-Munoz, PHD, Professor of World Languages and Cultures, Department of World Languages and Cultures, PHD, Washington University; MA, University of Havana; BA, Maxim Gorki Institute

Manuel Triano Lopez, PHD, Associate Professor of Spanish, Department of World Languages and Cultures, PHD, Indiana University; MA, Indiana University; BA, Universidad de Sevilla

Samar M Zahrawi, PHD, Assistant Professor of Arabic, Department of World Languages and Cultures, PHD, University of Leeds; BA, Al-Ba'ath University

Interim Faculty

Caleb Leroy Baker, MA, Lecturer of Spanish, Department of World Languages and Cultures, MA, Sam Houston State University; BA, Sam Houston State University

Siham Bouamer, MA, Visiting Assistant Professor of French, Department of World Languages and Cultures, MA, St Louis University; BA, Mullhouse University

Vianey Gutierrez, MA, Lecturer of Spanish, Department of World Languages and Cultures, MA, Sam Houston State University; BBA, Institute of Tech of Chihuahua

Joseph Marvin Holmberg, MS, Lecturer of World Languages and Cultures, Department of World Languages and Cultures, MS, Rochester Inst of Technology; BA, Gallaudet University

Silvia Alemany Huntsman, MAT, Lecturer of Spanish, Department of World Languages and Cultures, MAT, Indiana University; BA, Universidad de Barcelona

Julio Cesar Medina Lopez, MA, Lecturer of Spanish, Department of World Languages and Cultures, MA, Sam Houston State University; LICEN, Universidad Contemporanea

Christine Renee Neuville-Taylor, MED, Lecturer of Spanish, Department of World Languages and Cultures, MED, Sam Houston State University; BA, Oklahoma City Univ; BA, Oklahoma City Univ

Audrey Bryant Powell, PHD, Lecturer of World Languages and Cultures, Department of World Languages and Cultures, PHD, Texas AM University; MA, Baylor University; BA, Baylor University

Ray S Renteria, MA, Lecturer of Spanish, Department of World Languages and Cultures, MA, Texas Tech University; BA, Texas Tech University

Jose O Velasquez, MS, Lecturer of American Sign Language, Department of World Languages and Cultures, MS, Lamar University; BA, Gallaudet University