Department of English

Chair:   Jacob Blevins (936) 294-1402    

Information: (936) 294-1404; Evans Building 458; Shanna Hollis, Assistant to the Chair

Website: Department of English

The Department of English offers students the opportunity to study language, literature, composition, and cultures.

Mission

The Department of English strives to provide students with opportunities to grow as learners and as individuals. Students in the English Program may, through study of literature, gain an awareness and knowledge of themselves and their contemporary world. English students may also combine their cultural interests with specific vocational objectives, such as professional writing, teaching, or pre-professional training for law, business, or medicine.

English forms the cornerstone of the humanities. In a variety of courses in literature, writing, and the English language, students find a source of personal enrichment, and they develop verbal, analytic, and cultural skills readily adaptable to a variety of careers.

English students learn to write with precision, to read and analyze texts with accuracy, to conduct research and organize a welter of materials, to speak and listen well — in short, to sharpen critical thinking and inquiry skills. These skills are highly valued by prospective employers. Most professions, while expecting new employees to be familiar with their specific fields, stress above all else the ability of their employees to read, write, think, and speak proficiently. Similarly, professional schools are interested in the student who reads, writes, thinks, and speaks well. Brochures from medical and law schools, for example, reflect an increasing awareness of the importance of an English background for future physicians and attorneys.

Academic Programs

Students in English may choose the Bachelor of Arts in English with an approved minor or may choose composite teacher certification in English, Language Arts, and Reading. Students may also opt to minor in English (with or without Secondary Education Certification), in Creative Writing, in Professional Writing, or in American Studies.

Highlights

  • The English Department focuses on excellent teaching, featuring a Minnie Stevens Piper Teaching Award winner, a Texas State University Regents' Professor and Distinguished Professor, and numerous Sam Houston State University Teaching Excellence Award winners.
  • Faculty actively publish in national and international journals, win national literary awards, and serve as editors of scholarly journals.
  • Nationally recognized writers are brought to campus each year to read their works to students and discuss the writing and publishing process. Such writers have included Richard Bausch, Alan Cheuse, George Garrett, Allison Joseph, X.J. Kennedy, Maurice Kilwein, Galway Kinnell, Alex Lemon, Larry McMurtry, Marilyn Nelson and Tim O'Brien.
  • Students may publish and present their writing and to enter writing contests. Numerous students have published works in regional and national journals.
  • Academy of American Poets Prize - Students may compete for a poetry-writing prize judged by a nationally recognized poet.
  • Students may write technical documents for non-profit and other community groups.

Suggested Minors

SHSU offers a wide range of courses and areas students may use to structure a minor, and students should choose a minor to fit their individual interests and career goals. English majors may minor in Creative Writing, Professional Writing, or American Studies. Other common minors for English majors include Communication Studies, History, Mass Communication, Political Science, and Education.

Career Opportunities

When graduates leave SHSU with a degree in English, they are prepared for career opportunities or advanced study in teaching, technical and professional communication, journalism, government service, editing, scholarly and trade publishing, law, and business.

Student Organizations and Activities

Students in English may participate in many activities that will enrich their undergraduate experience and support the courses that they take:

  • The Sam Houston State Review is a literary magazine that publishes the writing of SHSU students. The Review staff consists of SHSU students working closely with a faculty advisor.
  • Sigma Tau Delta, the English honor society, invites junior and senior English majors and minors to become members of this prestigious national organization, with membership in the society recorded on each student's transcript. Sigma Tau Delta is an active student organization, sponsoring an annual food drive and readings throughout the school year. Applications for Sigma Tau Delta are available in the English office.
  • The Texas Review is a nationally recognized literary magazine that, twice a year, publishes fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and reviews by writers from around the world. Texas Review Press sponsors the publication of eighteen to twenty-four books a year. Students may serve as interns while working as members of the Review and Press staff.
  • The Writer's Forum provides opportunities for all SHSU students to publish their writing.

Internships and Study Abroad

  • Texas Review Press - Students may serve as interns at Texas Review Press. Interns are involved in a variety of tasks, ranging from charting the development of a manuscript to evaluating submissions to the literary journal.
  • Internships in business and industry may be available for qualified students who are working on a minor in Technical and Professional Writing. 
  • A student exchange program with the English Department at the University of Turku, Finland, provides students with an opportunity to study abroad for either a semester or a full year and transfer coursework toward their SHSU degree.

Scholarships

Several English scholarships are available for outstanding undergraduate students. Information on University scholarships may be obtained at Scholarship4kats or telephone 936-294-1672. You may also call the English Department Office (936-294-1403) for more information.

ENGL 0111. Tutorial for Basic Writing. 1 Hour.

This course is a one-hour writing tutorial, which focuses on basic conventions of college writing, providing instruction in the fundamentals of English grammar, mechanics, word choice, vocabulary, and spelling. The primary concerns are the word, the sentence, the paragraph, and the short theme. The goals of the course are to raise the students' level of understanding of SAE (Standard American English), support them in the ENGL 1301 in which they are simultaneously enrolled, and prepare them for ENGL 1302. Prerequisite: Score of 360-362 in writing in the Texas Success Initiative Assessment Test or Departmental Approval. Credit in this course will not be allowed to count toward graduation or computation of grade point average or classification of students by hours completed. (Course does not fulfill University degree requirements.)
Prerequisite: Score slightly below passing on the writing portion of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Assessment Test or departmental approval.

ENGL 1301. Composition I. 3 Hours.

Basic studies in English diction, sentence structure, and rhetoric with emphasis on the development of college level writing. Students scoring 363 or higher in the Texas Success Initiative Assessment may enroll in this course without the companion course ENGL 0111.

ENGL 1302. Composition II. 3 Hours.

A continued study of writing skills in English, emphasizing more complex methods in the writing process thanvENGL 1301. This course prepares students to write academic essays and research papers. An oral component is also included.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301.

ENGL 2332. Wrld Lit I: Before 17 Century. 3 Hours.

Readings in the classical, medieval, and renaissance masterpieces to analyze and evaluate the philosophical insights and aesthetic values of writers of various cultures. Written assignments are based on themes and concepts in the works studied. Open to all students. Required of English majors.
Prerequisite: ENG 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 2333. World Lit II: 17th C & After. 3 Hours.

Readings in selected works of representative writers of various cultures beginning from the seventeenth century through the present. Written assignments are based on themes and concepts in the works studied. Open to all students.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3330. Intro To Technical Writing. 3 Hours.

A course in the special problems of technical literature and technical report writing, focusing on the design and content of written communications in business, industry, and government.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3334. Literature And Film. 3 Hours.

A study of the structure, imagery, characterization, and themes of novels, short stories, essays and poems with those of selected motion picture films.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3336. Studies In Women's Literature. 3 Hours.

A study of works by women writers encompassing a variety of genres, nationalities, and literary periods.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302 and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3337. African-American Literature. 3 Hours.

Exploration of historical, political, and literary problems particular to African-American writers; the course also explores the development of African-American identity through cultural expression in a variety of media and genres.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302 and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3338. Studies In Multicultural Lit. 3 Hours.

Study of themes, techniques, and literary movements from different cultures. Focus will typically be on more than one ethnic or national culture.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302 and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3360. Survey Of American Lit To 1865. 3 Hours.

A survey of themes, genres, and authors in American literary history from the period of exploration and settlement through the American Renaissance and the Civil War. Required of all English majors.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3361. Survey Amer Lit From 1865-Pres. 3 Hours.

A survey of authors, genres, and movements in American literature from 1865 to the present, including representative works of Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism. Required of all English majors.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302 and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3363. Mythology. 3 Hours.

The study of myths and their application to literary studies. Recommended for certification program in Language Arts composite (see Secondary Education Requirements).
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302 and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3364. Folklore. 3 Hours.

The study of folk motifs of various cultures throughout the world. Recommended for certification program in Language Arts (see Secondary Education Requirements.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302 and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3370. Modern Drama. 3 Hours.

The major figures in modern British, American and Continental drama.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302 and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3372. Introduction to Linguistics. 3 Hours.

A general introduction to English linguistics. The course covers areas such as the sound system of English, the structure and meaning of words and sentences, language use in context, language and the brain, dialect and register variation, and the place and history of English among the languages of the world.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3373. English Grammar. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the linguistic analysis of English sentence structure. Students learn to identify different grammatical forms and their functions, different sentence types, and transformations. The course provides an analytic understanding of students’ pre-existing linguistic knowledge—the knowledge that allows them to generate an infinite number of grammatical patterns with a mere handful of rules.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3374. Teaching Writing and Lit. 3 Hours.

Theory and practices of teaching writing and literature in the secondary school. The course will focus on classroom practices, definition of standards, invention, assignment design, evaluation of student writing, and approaches to young adult literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, ENGL 3373 and ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3377. Argument And Persuasion. 3 Hours.

An advanced writing class that focuses on successful argumentative and persuasive writing. Study will include a survey of the history of argument, structuring of a sound argument, and stylistics.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302 and ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3378. Designing Written Documents. 3 Hours.

(Prior SH course id: ENG 378); In this course students will analyze and create written and electronic documents using major rhetorical and visual design theories. Students will craft professional texts that integrate effective visual and written strategies to create complete and compelling messages across a variety of workplace genres.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302 and ENGL 3330.

ENGL 3380. Advanced Composition. 3 Hours.

A study of rhetorical forms and approaches to problems of composition.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302 and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3381. Intro Creative Writing:Fiction. 3 Hours.

Directed writing in fiction.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3382. Intro Creative Writing: Poetry. 3 Hours.

Directed writing in poetry.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3383. Practicum In Publishing. 3 Hours.

The study of topics and issues related to editing and publishing. Students will be placed with internal or external organizations for semester-long internships.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and either ENGL 3381 or ENGL 3382.

ENGL 3384. Early English Masterworks. 3 Hours.

A study of the major figures in British literature from the beginning to 1798. Required for all English majors.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3385. Later English Masterworks. 3 Hours.

A study of the major figures in British literature from 1798 to the present. Required for all English majors.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3388. Texas Crossroads. 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary study of intersections among literature, history, science, culture, and politics of the "Crossroads" area of Texas. of ENGL 3000 level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 3390. The Bible As Literature. 3 Hours.

Narrative, structural, and thematic study of selected books of the Old and New Testament. Course of study includes an examination of Hebrew and Christian scriptures in translation and an analysis of various genres. Consideration will also be given to the cultural and mythological context of selected portions and to some of the literary influences exerted by these passages.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3391. Shakespeare: Tragedies & Hist. 3 Hours.

A study of Shakespeare's tragedies and histories, from the earliest experiments of his career to the great history plays of the 1590's through the major tragedies of the early 1600's.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 3392. Shakespeare:Comedies & Romance. 3 Hours.

A study of Shakespeare's comedies and romances from his early years through the great festive comedies of the late 1590's through the "Dark Comedies" of the 1600's to the romances of the last years of his career.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333.

ENGL 4330. Writing In The Professions. 3 Hours.

Additional training in technical writing, including instruction in the preparation and editing of specialized documents in various professional writing situations.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and ENGL 3330.

ENGL 4331. Comp Thry & The Tching Of Wrtg. 3 Hours.

An introduction to pedagogical technique for composition appropriate for elementary and secondary students. Major theories of composition will be studied.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hours of 3000 level ENGL.

ENGL 4335. Studies In Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

Selected topics may include rhetorical theory, style and stylistics, rhetorical criticism, ethical issues in rhetoric, and rhetoric literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and ENGL 3384.

ENGL 4339. Teaching Lit Of Diversity. 3 Hours.

A study of literature by women and by persons of color appropriate for the secondary English classroom.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302, ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs of ENGL 3000 level.

ENGL 4340. Professional Style and Editing. 3 Hours.

Students in this course engage in an advanced study of style and editing in the specialized conventions of technical and professional communication. Students learn to analyze, generate, and refine technical prose.
Prerequisite: ENGL 3330.

ENGL 4360. The English Romantic Movement. 3 Hours.

A survey of the Romantic moment in England, with major emphasis upon the works of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, and Shelley. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4363. Studies English Renaissance. 3 Hours.

A study of non-dramatic literature of England written between 1500 and 1660. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4364. Mth Tch Eng In Sec Sch. 3 Hours.

Directed studies and practice in the selection, organization, and presentation of English subject matter and skills to students. Required for English majors and minors who are working for a secondary teaching certificate.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, ENGL 3374 and ENGL 2332 or 2333.

ENGL 4365. Victorian Literature. 3 Hours.

A survey of major writers of the Victorian period, supplemented by lectures on the political, social and economic background of the age. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4367. History Of English Language. 3 Hours.

A survey of the English language, including its relationship to other Indo-European languages, followed by a study of the changes in English sounds, morphology, syntax, and lexicon from Anglo-Saxon times to the present. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4369. Studies Sel Genres In Am Lit. 3 Hours.

Readings in major writers, themes, and/or historical movements within a selected genre in American literature. The approach may vary from semester to semester, and will include such subjects as modern poetry, the short story, the Naturalists, folklore, regional literature, nonfiction prose, or others. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4370. American Regional Literature. 3 Hours.

Selected representative Southern/Southwestern writers. Readings will emphasize works of artistic merit, but they may include ancillary material such as folklore, “local color,” and historical documents for background study. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4372. American Lit: 1820'S - 1860'S. 3 Hours.

A study of the emergence of a distinctive American literary art, including such writers as Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4374. Studies In The English Novel. 3 Hours.

The study of a variety of topics and figures in the British novel. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4375. Special Problems In English. 3 Hours.

Directed study on individual topics or problems for advanced students. Admission by permission of the Department Chair. This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4376. Tudor And Stuart Drama. 3 Hours.

The development of the drama in England, the predecessors and contemporaries of Shakespeare. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4377. Lit-Rstoratn &18 Cen:1660-1800. 3 Hours.

A study of the drama, poetry, and prose of the “long eighteenth century.” The course reads the works of such writers as Dryden, Swift, Pope, and Johnson within their cultural contexts. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4378. Studies In World Fiction. 3 Hours.

The study of a variety of topics and figures in world fiction. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4380. Adv Creative Wrtng: Nonfiction. 3 Hours.

An advanced undergraduate writing workshop that emphasizes the theory and craft of creative nonfiction, with special attention to peer review of student writing in the areas of the memoir, the personal essay, personal cultural criticism, and literary journalism.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and ENGL 3380.

ENGL 4381. Adv Creative Writing: Fiction. 3 Hours.

An advanced undergraduate writing workshop that emphasizes the theory of modern and contemporary fiction, with special attention to peer review of student writing in the areas of the novel and short fiction.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and ENGL 3381.

ENGL 4382. Adv Creative Writing: Poetry. 3 Hours.

An advanced writing class that emphasizes the writing of poetry, with related outside readings in poetic theory and form.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and ENGL 3382.

ENGL 4383. Development Of Drama In Amer. 3 Hours.

A study of major movements and significant figures in American dramatic literature from Royall Tyler to the present. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4384. Studies In The American Novel. 3 Hours.

The study of a variety of topics and figures in the American novel. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4385. Studies In Chaucer. 3 Hours.

A close study of the works of Chaucer, with primary emphasis on "The Canterbury Tales" as they reflect the man and his times. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4386. Literature Of The Middle Ages. 3 Hours.

A study of selected works of Old and Middle English literature with some continental works. The course will include, at various times, works as early as Beowulf (ca. 8th-9th c.) to ones as late as Malory’s "Morte D’Arthur" (late 15th c.). of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4387. 20th Cnt Lit-Eng,Irel,Commwlth. 3 Hours.

A study of a variety of 20th-century literature by writers associated with England, Ireland, or English-speaking groups (not American) formerly colonized by the British. Though the course varies from term to term, it generally aims to have students read literary works by major figures, learn of the cultural and historical forces influencing these works and writers, and develop an understanding of the main concepts and movements that distinguish this body of literature. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4390. Literary Criticism And Theory. 3 Hours.

A survey of the major modes of literary criticism. Study of the basic concepts underlying specific theories of literary criticism and their application and impact within a literary field selected by the instructor. of ENGL 3000-level.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs.

ENGL 4394. Stdy 17th Century British Lit. 3 Hours.

(Previous SH course: ENGL 494); This course is designed to offer students a survey of British literature in the seventeenth century. Major authors of the period will be given special attention.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2342 or ENGL 2311, and ENGL 3384.

ENGL 4399. Stdy In Sel Lit Apprchs & Topc. 3 Hours.

The modified topics course is designed to vary from semester to semester. Topics may focus on a particular author, region, period, theme, genre, or critical approach.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, ENGL 3384 and 6 completed hours ENGL 3000-level.


 

Chair: Jacob Damon Blevins

Ira R Adams, PHD, Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, University of Virginia - SFS; MA, University of Virginia - SFS; BA, Washington Lee University

Kimberly K Bell, PHD, Professor of English and Dean of Honors College, Department of English, PHD, Georgia State University; MA, Clark University; BA, The American College of Greece

Tracy E. Bilsing, PHD, Associate Professor of English, Assistant Dean of Honors College, Department of English, PHD, Texas AM University; MA, Sam Houston State University; BA, Sam Houston State University

Brian D Blackburne, PHD, Associate Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Central Florida; MA, Univ of North Texas; BA, Texas AM University

Jacob Damon Blevins, PHD, Professor and Chair of English, Department of English, PHD, Texas Tech University; MFA, McNeese State University; MA, McNeese State University; BA, McNeese State University

Elizabeth Ching-In Chen, PHD, Assistant Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; MFA, Univ of Calif-Riverside; BA, Tufts University

Paul W Child, PHD, Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Notre Dame; MA, James Madison University; BA, Saint John'S University

Lee F Courtney, PHD, Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Emory University; MA, Texas AM University; BA, Texas AM University

Michael T Demson, PHD, Assistant Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Cuny City Coll; MA, Cuny City Coll; BA, Reed College

Robert E. Donahoo, PHD, Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Duke University; MA, Duke University; BA, Baylor University; BA, Baylor University

Diane Dowdey, PHD, Associate Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison; MA, Univ of Missouri-Columbia; BA, Texas Christian University; BA, Texas Christian University

Olivia Clare Friedman, PHD, Assistant Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Nevada-Las Vegas; MFA, University of Iowa; BA, Univ of Calif-Berkeley

Julie E Hall, PHD, Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of N Carolina-Chapel Hill; MA, Univ of N Carolina-Chapel Hill; BA, Univ of The South

Sirkka Helena Halmari, PHD, Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Southern California; MA, Univ of Southern California; MA, California St Un-San Bernardin; MSS, University of Tampere; MA, University of Tampere; BA, University of Tampere

Darci N Hill, PHD, Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Texas Woman's University; MA, Texas State Univ-San Marcos; BA, Texas State Univ-San Marcos; BA, Texas State Univ-San Marcos

Scott Aaron Kaukonen, PHD, Associate Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Missouri-Columbia; MFA, Univ of Arizona; BA, Hope College

Marion Douglas Krienke, PHD, Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Toledo; MA, Texas AM University; BA, Sam Houston State University

Nicolas J Lantz, MFA, Assistant Professor of English, Department of English, MFA, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison; BA, Lewis Clark College

Audrey D Murfin, PHD, Assistant Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Suny At Binghamton; MA, Suny At Binghamton; BA, Reed College

Carroll F. Nardone, PHD, Associate Professor of English and Associate Dean, CHSS, Department of English, PHD, New Mexico State University; MA, Ohio State Univ; BA, Univ of Texas-El Paso

Jason M Payton, PHD, Assistant Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Maryland-College Park; MA, Univ of Kentucky; BA, Milligan College

Deborah Lynne Phelps, PHD, Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Delaware; MA, Univ of Delaware; BS, Towson State University

April A Shemak, PHD, Associate Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Maryland-College Park; MA, Univ of Maryland-College Park; BA, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison; BA, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison

Kandi A Tayebi, PHD, Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Denver; MA, Univ of Northern Colorado; BA, Univ of Northern Colorado

Linda Joyce Webster, PHD, Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Texas AM University; MA, Sam Houston State University; BA, Sam Houston State University

Eugene O. Young, PHD, Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Tennessee-Knoxville; MA, West Texas AM State Univ; BA, West Texas AM State Univ

Interim Faculty

Amanda Lynn Nowlin-O'Banion, PHD, Visiting Assistant Professor of English, Department of English, PHD, Univ of Houston-Main; MFA, New York University; BA, Southern Methodist University

Ralph W. Pease, PHD, Professor Emeritus of English, Department of English, PHD, Texas AM University; MA, Southern Methodist University; BA, Univ of Texas At Austin

Brandon C Strubberg, MA, Visiting Assistant Professor of English, Department of English, MA, Sam Houston State University; BA, Sam Houston State University