Department of Psychology & Philosophy

Chair: Christopher Wilson   (936) 294-3052

Website: Department of Psychology and Philosophy

Mission

The Department of Psychology and Philosophy supports the Mission Statement of the University and that of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. The Department is committed to providing a quality educational environment conducive to scholarship and the acquisition of knowledge and applicable skills. We recognize that this ideal requires the effective use of faculty expertise and creativity, a sensitivity to needs of university and community, as well as a genuine concern for the abilities and goals of students.

Philosophy Program

Coordinator of Philosophy Program: Glenn Sanford

Information:  (936) 294-1510; CHSS 359

Website: Philosophy Program

Highlights

  • Opportunities for collaborative scholarly research.
  • Texas Gamma Chapter, the local chapter of Phi Sigma Tau, the National Honor Society in Philosophy offers networking opportunities with undergraduate students and faculty

Suggested Minors

  • Art
  • Biology
  • Criminal Justice
  • English
  • History
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Photography
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Sociology

Career Opportunities

A Philosophy major is an excellent preparation for law school. Other careers pursued by Philosophy majors include theology, teaching, systems analysis, and medicine.

Psychology Program

Information:  Contact the department at (936) 294-3552 or visit CHSS 390

Website: Psychology Program

Highlights

  • Faculty-student collaborative research opportunities.
  • Local Chapter of Psi Chi, the National Honor Society for Psychology and the Psychology Club offer networking opportunities with undergraduate and graduate students and faculty.
  • Psychology faculty publish in nationally recognized scientific journals.

Suggested Minors

  • Biology
  • Business Administration
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Criminal Justice
  • Philosophy
  • Statistics
  • Special Education
  • Gerontology

Career Opportunities

The Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology is a useful and interesting program of study for liberal arts students and those desiring work in such areas as human services, public relations, correctional institutions, rehabilitation facilities, program development, and research to name just a few.

Psychology

Student Organizations and Activities

  • Psi Chi Chapter, the National Honor Society for Psychology, Local Chapter
  • Psychology Club

Scholarships

John D. Symonds Scholarship. The fund is established in memory of Dr. John Dobie Symonds, Associate Professor of Psychology at Sam Houston State University. Dr. Symonds published and presented scholarly papers in several areas including sleep research, cross-cultural research, and social learning theory.

Please refer to the on-line Scholarships4Kats program for information regarding all scholarship opportunities in the Program, in the Department, and at the University.

Philosophy

Student Organizations and Activities

Texas Gamma Chapter, the local chapter of Phi Sigma Tau, the National Honor Society in Philosophy

Scholarships

  • Richard A. Cording Endowed Scholarship
  • Thomas W. Satre Endowed Scholarship. The fund is established in memory Dr. Thomas W. Satre, Professor of Philosophy at Sam Houston State University.

Please refer to the on-line Scholarships4Kats program for information regarding all scholarship opportunities in this Program, in the Department, and at the University.

Philosophy

PHIL 1301. Introduction To Philosophy. 3 Hours.

A general examination of the fields and issues of philosophy as discussed by both classical and modern philosophers. Philosophical problems discussed include the existence of God, the nature of knowledge and truth, the issue of human free will, and theories of moral judgement.

PHIL 2303. Critical Thinking. 3 Hours.

Designed to improve students? ability to think critically. The course covers the fundamentals of deductive reasoning, the identification of common fallacies, and an introduction to inductive reasoning, as well as sensitizing the students to some of the ways information is distorted, e.g., by advertising and news management.

PHIL 2306. Contemporary Moral Issues. 3 Hours.

A study of major moral issues in contemporary society. Includes topics such as abortion, euthanasia, censorship, capital punishment, and other issues that confront today's society.

PHIL 2352. Introduction to Contemporary Logic. 3 Hours.

Introduces the student to the principles of ordered thought and to the terminology and rules of symbolic logic. Discusses the logic of statements and the logic of predicates, qualifiers, and identity.

PHIL 3364. Ancient & Medieval Philosophy. 3 Hours.

A survey of philosophical thought from the time of the pre-Socratics to about 1500. Includes the study of the work of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Hellenistic schools, and medieval philosophy through the late scholastic period. The artistic, scientific, ethical, political and general cultural ramifications of the major systems of thought are noted.

PHIL 3365. Modern Philosophy. 3 Hours.

A survey of philosophical thought from about 1500 through the twentieth century. The course will examine the philosophical significance of the rise of modern science, the classical philosophies of rationalism, empiricism, the philosophy of Kant, and the development of these philosophies through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

PHIL 3366. Aesthetics. 3 Hours.

An inquiry into the nature and meaning of art. Analysis of aesthetic experience, the relation of art to value, and an examination of aesthetic theories concerning representation, form and expression. This course satisfies 3 semester hours of the fine arts requirement for the BA degree program.

PHIL 3367. Philosophy Of Religion. 3 Hours.

An examination of the nature and meaning of religion and religious expression. Philosophical and scientific critiques of religious faith and experience are considered. The nature of faith and reason, the question of the existence and nature of God, and the relation of religion and value are typical course topics.

PHIL 3371. Existentialism& Self-Awareness. 3 Hours.

An examination of the major themes of existentialism and its impact on contemporary society. Existential works from literature, psychology, psychoanalysis, and religion are included. Examines the existential concepts of anxiety, fear, guilt, meaninglessness, death, and authentic and inauthentic existence. Taught with PSYC 3371.

PHIL 3372. Philosophy Of Science. 3 Hours.

A survey of topics in philosophy of science including the logic of explanations in the physical and social sciences, the relations of science to the realm of values, and a look at the ?mind-body problem?.

PHIL 4306. Philosophy of Biology. 3 Hours.

A seminar course investigating philosophical questions concerning the development and application of evolutionary theory. This course addresses issues relating to concepts such as adaptation, speciation, the comparative method, levels of selection, and phylogenetic reconstruction.

PHIL 4333. Bioethics. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of bioethics. In this class students will use various ethical theories and moral principles to analyze and critically evaluate moral dilemmas in medicine. This course covers a broad range of issues including: 1) the patient-physician relationship, 2) bias in medicine, 3) health care delivery systems and 4) the ethics of research. To enhance critical thinking skills and decision making skills, students will be required to develop and defend views on given bioethical issues. Credit: 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

PHIL 4361. Philosophy of Psych and Mind. 3 Hours.

This course will examine a range of contemporary theories of mind and the primary objections they face. Topics may include: Mind/brain identity theory and reductionism, the nature and function of consciousness, the nature of rationality and its relation to consciousness, the possibility of machine intelligence, and the nature of mental representation.

PHIL 4363. Ethical Theories. 3 Hours.

This course will cover classical views about the foundation of ethics such as divine commands, cultural relativism, subjectivism, egoism, utilitarianism, Kantianism, and virtue ethics. Significant attention will also be given to a variety of contemporary approaches to understanding ethics.

PHIL 4371. Death And Dying. 3 Hours.

An examination of the philosophical reflections on death and dying from the literature of philosophy, psychology, theology, medicine and other contemporary sources. Course includes discussions of the nature of grief, sorrow, anxiety, fear, and suicide as related to death, and the social implications of death for the individual, family, friends, and community.

PHIL 4372. Theories Of Knowledge& Reality. 3 Hours.

This course is a study of issues concerning the basic categories of reality such as individuals and universals, time and change, mind and body. A study of issues in the theory of knowledge such as the distinction between knowledge and belief, the criteria of knowledge, and the justification of knowledge claims is also examined.
Prerequisite: 6 hours of philosophy and sophomore standing.

PHIL 4373. Phil in Film & Literature. 3 Hours.

Through carefully selected pairings of philosophical texts and films, this course seeks to establish and develop philosophical literacy by highlighting the ways in which canonical philosophical works have informed the content and structure of works of film and literature.
Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy and at least sophomore standing.

PHIL 4380. Seminar In Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Affords students a chance for in-depth study of a particular topic or area in philosophy not covered fully in the other course offerings and a chance for participation in a course conducted on a seminar basis. As the topics vary, the course may be repeated for credit.

PHIL 4385. Readings In Philosophy. 3 Hours.

This course is designed especially for advanced students who are capable of independent study. The particular program of study for the course must be discussed in advance with the prospective instructor.
Prerequisite: Admission to the course requires permission of the instructor.

Psychology

PSYC 1301. Introduction To Psychology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 131); This course is designed to be a broad survey of the field of psychology covering such topics as learning, perception, personality, development, psychopathology, etc. It covers both the theoretical basis and the empirical content of these areas.

PSYC 2305. Professional Psychology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 237); A survey is made of clinical/counseling psychology, e.g. psychopathology, diagnostic instruments, methods and techniques; individual and group psychotherapy, theories, community psychology; professional ethics of the clinical/counseling psychologist.

PSYC 2307. Intro to School Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course provides a broad overview of the field of school psychology. Students gain exposure to theory and research on topics including cognitive and social development, learning, motivation, individual differences, classroom instruction and behavior management, and standardized testing within schools.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.

PSYC 2315. Psychology Of Adjustment. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 289); A study is made of the dynamics of human behavior applying psychological theory to the development of the wholesome well adjusted personality. Techniques for managing stress, reducing anxiety, coping with anger, increasing assertiveness, and achieving self-control are considered.

PSYC 3133. Physiological Psychology Lab. 1 Hour.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 313); Laboratory to be taken concurrently with PSYC 3333.

PSYC 3331. Abnormal Psychology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 331); This course includes an introduction to behavioral disorders. Biological and social factors in the development, diagnosis, and treatment of psychopathology are studied. .
Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of Psychology.

PSYC 3332. History Of Psychology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 332); This course includes an historical survey of the scientific and philosophic antecedents of modern psychology. .
Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of Psychology.

PSYC 3333. Physiological Psychology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 333); This course is designed to acquaint the student with the biological substrates of behavior. A study is made of the genetic, neuroanatomical, neurochemical and neurophysiological mechanisms of such psychological processes as sensation, movement, learning, memory, motivation and emotion. This course is offered primarily for psychology majors and minors but may serve as an elective for majors in biology, chemistry, and public health. Laboratory period required. .
Prerequisite: 3 hours in Psychology and 4 hours in Biology or consent of instructor.

PSYC 3334. Human Sexuality. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 334); A study is made of the biological, social, emotional, cognitive, and spiritual elements of our human sexuality. Topics such as sexual health, sexual dysfunction, sexuality education, and intimate relationships are covered.

PSYC 3336. Sensation/Perception. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 336); A study is made of the sensory processes, the relationship between physical stimuli and sensory/perceptual experience, and perceptual phenomena. Topics such as pain, constancies, illusions, and psychophysics are covered.

PSYC 3337. Cognition. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 337); This course is intended to provide a broad survey of the field of cognitive psychology covering such topics as attention, memory, forgetting, consciousness, and organization/structure. It covers both the theoretical basis and empirical content of the area.

PSYC 3365. Close Relationships. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 365); This course examines the processes of close relationships, employing psychological theory and research. Topics include the nature of intimacy, attraction, communication, interdependency, love, jealousy, conflict, and loneliness.

PSYC 3371. Humanistic Psychology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID PSY 371); An examination of the major themes of humanistic/existential psychology/philosophy and their impact on contemporary society. Works from literature, psychology, philosophy, and religion are included. Taught with PHIL 3371.

PSYC 3374. Development Psychology. 3 Hours.

A study is made of the physical, mental, emotional, and social growth and development of the person across the entire life span.

PSYC 3375. Psychopathology & Fam Dynamics. 3 Hours.

(Prior SH course id: PSY 375); This course examines the interactions of psychopathology and family dynamics. Topics include parenting, chronic physical illness, mood and anxiety disorders, physical and sexual abuse, and chemical dependence.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and either PSYC 3331, FACS 3369, SOCI 3331, or COMS 4386.

PSYC 3381. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 381); This course examines individual human behavior as it is influenced by cultural and social stimuli. Topics studied include interpersonal attraction, aggression, prejudice and sexism, conformity, altruism, and group behavior.

PSYC 3382. Comparative Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course deals with physical and behavioral differences in animals and how these differences can be adaptive. Specific topics include habitat selection, territoriality, predator and anti-predator behavior, reproductive behavior, and social behavior.
Prerequisite: PSYC 2302 and PSYC 3301.

PSYC 3383. Psychology And The Law. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 383); This course is designed to examine the application of scientific and professional principles of psychology in the legal system, the use of social science methods to study the legal system, and the impact of law on the practice of psychology. Content areas include legal competencies, the insanity defense, jury consultation, psychologists and the death penalty, the accuracy of eyewitness testimony, prediction of violence, the psychology of victims, family law, and ethical dilemmas. .
Prerequisite: 6 hours of PSYC.

PSYC 3385. Health Psychology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 385); This course examines how biological, psychological, and social factors interact and contribute to health promotion, illness prevention, coping with stress, pain, or other acute or chronic diseases, and recovery from and adjustment to serious health problems. .
Prerequisite: 6 hours of PSYC.

PSYC 3391. Psychopharmacology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 391); This course includes a study of the field of behavioral pharmacology: the systematic study of the effects of drugs on behavior and the way in which behavioral principles can help in understanding how drugs work. The course focuses on the neurophysiological mechanisms of action of various psychoactive drugs.

PSYC 3401. Research Methods. 4 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the scientific method in general and research methodology in psychology in particular through laboratory and field experiments. Laboratory period required.

PSYC 3402. Psychological Statistics. 4 Hours.

This course is a study of statistics as applied to problems in psychology and education, to include frequency functions, correlation and regression, and statistical tests of significance. Lecture and lab component.

PSYC 4075. Problems. 1-3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 475); Designed for advanced students in psychology who are capable of independent study. Variable Credit (1-3).
Prerequisite: Approval of Program Coordinator and the instructor directing the study.

PSYC 4331. Personality. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 431); A study is made of the major theories of personality; the biological and social factors in the development and functioning of personality are considered.
Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of Psychology.

PSYC 4332. Learning. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 432); This course includes a study of the major theories of learning and their historical backgrounds; experimental procedures in the study of learning are discussed.
Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of Psychology.

PSYC 4333. Seminar In Psychology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 433); This course includes discussions of selected topics in psychology.

PSYC 4334. Applied Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 434); This course examines the use of social psychological theory and method to explain and solve real world problems. Topics include physical and mental health, the environment, law, consumerism, and processes of conflict and social influence.
Prerequisite: PSYC 3381.

PSYC 4374. Psychology of the Elderly. 3 Hours.

This course examines the field of developmental psychology of the elderly addressing such topics as learning, perception, personality, development, mental health issues, etc. It addresses both the theoretical basis and the empirical content of these areas.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1301.

PSYC 4388. Psychological Testing. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 488); A study is made of group and individual differences and their assessment. The student is introduced to instruments and techniques used in the measurement of intelligence, aptitudes, achievement, interest, attitudes, and other dimensions of personality and behavior.
Prerequisite: 9 hours in Psychology including PSYC 1301 and PSYC 3301.

PSYC 4391. Divorce: Psychological Impact. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 491); A comprehensive investigation is made of psychological, legal, moral, religious, and cultural variables related to cause, process, and adjustment to divorce is made. Emphasis is placed on the impact of divorce on the individual.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PSYC 4392. Industrial/Organizational Psy. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 492); This course provides an integration of psychological principles as applied to industrial/organizational milieu. The focus is on the application of research methodology, psychological assessment, personality, and organizational theories to the work environment. Specifically, research related to the application of psychological theory related to personnel, work environment, organizational, and pertinent legal issues will be considered.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 or PSYC 2315.

PSYC 4393. Positive Psychology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: PSY 493); This course will focus on the scientific understanding of healthy human processes of positive emotions, character strengths, traits, and virtues (such as courage, gratitude, hope, optimism, self-regulation, spirituality, and wisdom). Assessment methods and intervention applications in diverse settings (e.g., education, health, corporate and organizational leadership, and clinical psychology) will be covered.
Prerequisite: 6 hours in Psychology.

Chair: Christopher Wilson

Jeffrey S Anastasi, PHD, Associate Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Suny At Binghamton; MA, Suny At Binghamton; BA, Suny At Binghamton

Jaime Lynn Anderson, MS, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, MS, Eastern Kentucky University; BA, Univ of Dayton; BA, Univ of Dayton

Courtney Swisher Banks, PHD, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Texas AM University; SSP, Texas AM - Commerce; BA, Baylor University

Marcus T Boccaccini, PHD, Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Alabama-Tuscaloosa; MA, Univ of Alabama-Tuscaloosa; BS, Univ of Santa Clara

Maria Del Pi Botero Jaramillo, PHD, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, York University; MA, York University; BA, Universidad Javeriana

Amos J. Bruce, PHD, Professor of Psychology; Associate Dean, College of Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Georgia; MS, Univ of Georgia; BA, Anderson University; BA, Anderson University

Mary A. Conroy, PHD, Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Houston-Main; MA, Colorado State University; BA, Michigan State University

James William Crosby, PHD, Associate Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Oklahoma State University; MS, Abilene Christian University; BS, Abilene Christian University

Donna M Desforges, PHD, Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Texas Christian University; MS, Texas Christian University; BA, Univ of Houston-Main

Frank K. Fair, PHD, Professor and Program Coordinator of Philosophy, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Georgia; MA, Boston College; AB, Xavier University

Stuart West Gurley, PHD, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of South Florida; MA, Univ of New Mexico; BA, Austin College; BA, Austin College

Marsha J Harman, PHD, Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Houston-Main; MED, Sam Houston State University; BSED, Univ of Houston-Main

Craig E Henderson, PHD, Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of North Texas; MA, Hardin Simmons University; BS, Howard Payne University; BS, Howard Payne University

Hillary Anne Langley, PHD, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of N Carolina-Chapel Hill; BA, Univ of N Carolina-Chapel Hill

Rowland Spence Miller, PHD, Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Florida; MA, Univ of Florida; BA, Cornell University

Benjamin Mitchell-Yellin, PHD, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Calif-Riverside; MA, Boston College; BA, Univ of Michigan

David V Nelson, PHD, Associate Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Washington; BS, Arizona State University; BS, Brigham Young University

Ramona M Noland, PHD, Associate Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Tennessee-Knoxville; BA, Wheeling College

Glenn M Sanford, PHD, Professor of Philosophy and Acting Associate Dean of CHSS, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Duke University; BA, College of Wooster

T C Sim, PHD, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Nevada-Reno; MA, Univ of Nevada-Reno; BA, Univ of Nevada-Reno; BA, Univ of Nevada-Reno

Jorge G Varela, PHD, Associate Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Alabama-Tuscaloosa; MA, Univ of Alabama-Tuscaloosa; BA, Florida Int'L Univ

Amanda Cristina Venta, PHD, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Houston-Main; MA, Univ of Houston-Main; BA, Rice University; BA, Rice University

Christopher Wilson, PHD, Professor of Psychology and Chair, Department of Psychology and Philosophy, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Texas Christian University; MA, Texas Christian University; BA, Eckerd College

Interim Faculty

Justin P Allen, SSP, Lecturer of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, SSP, Univ of Kansas; MA, Washburn University; BA, Kansas State University

Michael C Boyle, PHD, Lecturer of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Alliant Int University - Fresn; MS, Utah State University; BS, Brigham Young University; BA, Southern Utah University

Thomas John Brommage, PHD, Lecturer of Philosophy, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of South Florida; MA, Univ of South Florida; BA, Manhattanville College

Charles R Carlson, PHD, Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Texas AM University; MS, Texas AM University; MA, Univ of Toledo; BA, Augustana College

Alan C Clune, PHD, Lecturer of Philosophy, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, University of Buffalo, Suny; MS, Rensselaer Poly Inst; BS, Worcester Polytechni

Sharon Kay Hunter, PHD, Lecturer of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of S Carolina-Columbia; MED, Mississippi Univ For Women; BA, Univ of S Carolina-Columbia

Jessica Ruth Lee, MA, Lecturer of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, MA, Sam Houston State University; BS, Sam Houston State University

Bradley Allen Seaberg, MA, Lecturer of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, MA, Sam Houston State University; BS, Sam Houston State University

Diane Stoebner-May, PHD, Clinical Associate Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Univ of Houston-Main; MA, Univ of Texas-El Paso; BA, Univ of Texas-San Antonio

David Eugene Wright, PHD, Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Department of Psychology & Philosophy, PHD, Texas AM University; MA, Texas AM University; MA, Ohio University; BA, Bethel College; BA, Bethel College