Department of Economics & International Business

Chair: Mark Tuttle, Ph.D. (936) 294-1386

Website: Department of Economics & International Business

Vision

To develop outstanding Economics, International Business, and Business Analysis programs with faculty that is recognized for excellence in instruction, research, and service.

Mission

The mission of the Department of Economics and International Business is to support the mission of the University and the College of Business Administration by providing students with an academic foundation to become productive citizens, to develop successful careers, and to provide interested students with the background to pursue graduate or professional studies.  The Department will provide curricula that promote critical thinking skills and enhance decision making abilities, which help students become productive and informed citizens. Faculty will engage in research to create and disseminate new knowledge, develop quality-teaching skills, maintain high professional standards, and actively serve the University Community.

Academic Programs

The Department of Economics and International Business offers the Master of Science in Applied Economics degree program. The department also offers a variety of graduate courses to support the Master of Business Administration, Executive MBA in Banking and Financial Institutions, Master of Science in Accounting, and the Master of Science in Project Management degree programs.  See the current undergraduate catalog for details pertaining to undergraduate majors.

Business Analysis

BANA 5080. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

A directed study for individual students who wish intensive work in a special topic area of business analysis. Variable credit (1-3).
Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.

BANA 5300. Quantitative Tools For Busines. 3 Hours.

An introduction to a variety of quantitative tools used in the business sector. Emphasis is placed on statistical analyses and operations. In this course, students learn descriptive statistics, normal distribution theory, central limit theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing, and may also include linear programming, and forecasting. This course does not apply to the 36-hour graduate credit hour requirement of the MBA degree program.

BANA 5368. Tchnqs Of Statistical Analysis. 3 Hours.

An integration of the concepts and application of statistical and quantitative techniques currently used in business decision making. Readings in the current literature related to statistical inference, ANOVA, correlation, simple linear regression, multiple regression, questionnaire construction and analysis will be covered.

Economics

ECON 5080. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

A directed individual study is made of a selected problem in the field of economics. Variable credit (1-3).
Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.

ECON 5085. Special Topic. 1-3 Hours.

This course of faculty-led study is designed to provide graduate students exposure to new Economics topics and concepts in a course setting. Variable credit (1-3).

ECON 5300. Economic Principles And Policy. 3 Hours.

An intensive study of microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts; the price system and how it functions under various market structures including perfect competition, pure monopoly, and imperfect market structures including monopolistic competition and oligopoly; resource markets; national income measurement and determination; inflation and unemployment; money and banking; economic stabilization including monetary and fiscal policy; international policy. This course does not apply to the 36-hour graduate credit hour requirement of the MBA degree program.

ECON 5301. Mathematical Methods for Applied Economics. 3 Hours.

Students analyze and apply mathematical methods that are essential to graduate studies in economics and related disciplines. Topics include matrix algebra, differential calculus, optimization, and their applications to economic modeling.

ECON 5305. Microeconomics. 3 Hours.

Students analyze the behavior of consumers, firms, and markets. Topics include consumer choice models, firms’ costs, profits maximization, market structures, uncertainty, and market failures.
Prerequisite: ECON 5301.

ECON 5307. Macroeconomics. 3 Hours.

Students analyze current evidence and theories concerning economic growth and business cycles. Moreover, students will examine the use of fiscal and monetary policies to achieve competing macroeconomic goals of price stability and full employment.
Prerequisite: ECON 5301.

ECON 5325. Econometrics. 3 Hours.

Students examine methods used to estimate, interpret, and apply econometric methods for statistical models in a variety of business and economics settings. Topics include methods for linear cross-sectional models, linear panel-data models, and binary-outcome models.
Prerequisite: BANA 5368.

ECON 5340. International Economics. 3 Hours.

Students analyze a range of topics in international economics with a focus on trade theories, globalization, and financial systems.
Prerequisite: ECON 5305.

ECON 5348. Development Economics. 3 Hours.

Students focus on the microeconomic approaches to poverty-related problems faced by low-income countries. Students analyze the role of human capital, nutrition, infrastructures, credit market, agriculture, program evaluation, and institutions in the development process of low-income countries.

ECON 5350. Applied Topics in Health Economics. 3 Hours.

Students analyze the structure and functioning of the healthcare markets and economic equilibrium in healthcare markets using microeconomic and industrial organization principles. Topics include Grossman’s model of demand for healthcare, supply of healthcare, equilibrium in healthcare market under uncertainty and asymmetric information, market failure, role of insurance and risk analysis, and cost-effectiveness/benefit analysis.

ECON 5351. Seminar In Labor Economics. 3 Hours.

Labor economics focuses on short-run and long-run aspects of supply and demand of labor, including theory and empirical analysis of the behavior of participants in the labor force. Readings in current labor economics literature and appropriate research topics will be covered, including the history of labor organizations. Frequent topics include the microeconomic effects of marriage, fertility, and mobility on labor supply, as well as the macroeconomic effects of unemployment on inflation.

ECON 5352. Energy Economics. 3 Hours.

Students use microeconomic techniques to rigorously examine contemporary energy issues. The market structures for various international energy markets are analyzed, as well as the opportunities and challenges of government regulation and de-regulation of energy markets. Economic analysis of business practices and consumer behavior in markets for renewable energy are emphasized.

ECON 5357. Smnr Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the fundamental principles of economics that are most relevant to managerial decision-making. Students apply recent developments in economic analysis to topics such as market analysis, profitability and pricing, strategic behavior, and choice under risk and uncertainty.

ECON 5360. Economic Analysis Of Strategy. 3 Hours.

A study of game theoretical tools and their application of important real-world economic phenomena. Topics include: the organization of industry, labor and work-place economics, international trade policies, government and voting strategies, the role of legal institutions in the economy, and bargaining and bidding strategies.

ECON 5370. Economic Theory. 3 Hours.

An integration of micro and macro economic theory with special emphasis on how various economic policy choices may impact the operation of business firms and the national economy. The course requires students to find micro and macroeconomic issues of current interest, gather related quantitative data, and review recent research that apply/test the theories covered in this course.

ECON 5373. Urban Economics. 3 Hours.

Students analyze the economic forces that determine location choices of firms and individuals, as well as the existence and performance of urban agglomerations resulting from these location choices. The methodologies used to measure the spatial distribution of economic activity, public policy solutions to market failures, and urban economic development are examined.

Director/Chair: Markland Howard Tuttle

Milo D. Berg, PHD, Associate Professor of Business Analysis, Department of Economics & Intl Business, PHD, Texas A&M University; BSB, Univ of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Cosmas B Domonaamwin Dery, PHD, Assistant Professor of Economics, Department of Economics & Intl Business, PHD, Univ of Calgary; MA, Univ of Lethbridge; BA, University of Ghana

David M Drukker, PHD, Associate Professor of Economics, Department of Economics & Intl Business, PHD, Univ of Texas At Austin; MS, Univ of Texas At Austin; BA, Oberlin College

Mark W. Frank, PHD, Professor of Economics, Department of Economics & Intl Business, PHD, Univ of Texas At Dallas; MS, Univ of Texas At Dallas; BS, Texas A&M University

Fidel Gonzalez, PHD, Professor of Economics, Department of Economics & Intl Business, PHD, Univ of Texas At Austin; MS, Univ of Texas At Austin

Darren P Grant, PHD, Associate Professor of Economics, Department of Economics & Intl Business, PHD, Florida State University; BS, Florida State University

Youn Oh Kim, PHD, Associate Professor of Economics, Department of Economics & Intl Business, PHD, Univ of Southern California; MA, Univ of Southern California; BA, Ewha Womans Univ.

Hiranya K Nath, PHD, Professor of Economics, Department of Economics & Intl Business, PHD, Southern Methodist University; MA, Southern Methodist University; MPHIL, Jawaharlal Nehru University; MA, University of Delhi; BA, University of Delhi

Vlad Marius Radoias, PHD, Associate Professor of Economics, Department of Economics & Intl Business, PHD, Univ of Southern California; MA, Central Michigan Univ; BA, Bucharest Acad of Eco Studies

Christian Werner Raschke, PHD, Associate Professor of Economics, Department of Economics & Intl Business, PHD, LSU & A&M College; MS, LSU & A&M College; BS, Southeast Missouri State Univ

Raisa Tasnim Sara, MSC, Assistant Professor of Economics, Department of Economics & Intl Business, MSC, Univ of London - School Econ; BSC, Queen Mary Univ of London

Nazanin Sedaghatkish, PHD, Assistant Professor of Economics and International Business, Department of Economics & Intl Business, PHD, Virginia Polytechnic&State U; PHD, Virginia Polytechnic&State U

Markland Howard Tuttle, PHD, Professor of Economics and Acting Chair, Economics & International Business, Department of Economics & Intl Business, PHD, Univ of Tennessee-Knoxville; MBA, Sam Houston State University; BBA, Sam Houston State University