School of Nursing

Director: Denise Neill (936) 202-5109

Website: School of Nursing

The School of Nursing (SON) currently has three programs, all leading to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree (BSN).  The programs are BSN (pre-licensure), RN to BSN (post RN licensure), and LVN to BSN (post LVN licensure). 

Vision Statement

To set the standard in nursing education to shape the profession and transform communities.

Mission

Advance knowledge, prepare and inspire nurses to meet the healthcare needs of diverse populations in a dynamic environment.

Program Outcomes for Graduates

  1. Integrate knowledge from liberal arts studies and nursing science to practice professional nursing in a holistic caring manner.
  2. Develop, implement, and evaluate safe quality patient care through collaboration with patients and members of the inter-professional healthcare delivery team in various healthcare settings.
  3. Demonstrate ethical accountability and legal responsibilities using cultural parameters and professional nursing standards of practice and care in order to provide care to individuals, families, groups, and populations.
  4. Use therapeutic communication in formal and informal interaction with patients, families, groups, colleagues, and other members of the healthcare team in the delivery of nursing care.
  5. Demonstrate professional leadership and management skills while implementing safety principles in the delivery of nursing care.
  6. Provide safe patient care using evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning.
  7. Advocate for clients across the lifespan and for the nursing profession while incorporating dynamic healthcare system practices, health policies, and global healthcare factors.
  8. Demonstrate accountability for lifelong learning and professional growth.
  9. Demonstrate competency with technology and information management in the delivery of safe care, while maintaining confidentiality and protecting patient rights.
  10. Collaborate with other professionals on the healthcare team to provide health promotion and disease, and injury prevention across the lifespan for individuals, families, groups and populations.

Highlights

The School of Nursing offers a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. Since beginning in January 2011, the upper division program is fully approved by the Texas Board of Nursing and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE); 655 K Street, NW, Suite 750; Washington, DC 20001; 202-887-6791. The NCLEX first-time pass rate consistently exceeds that of the state and nation.  Graduates are sought for positions regionally and statewide. Many are employed in high acuity areas and enrolled in nurse internships within six months of graduation. The faculty include doctoral prepared and advanced practice nurses, and those engaged in active clinical practice which enhances the educational environment.

Progam Specific Requirements

BSN (Pre-licensure program)

Process for Nursing Program Admission

  1. Apply to SHSU through Undergraduate Admissions, for the semester you wish to begin the Nursing program.
  2. Submit your application to the Nursing Program via Nursing CAS for the semester you wish to begin the School of Nursing.
  3. Take the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) and have results sent to the SHSU School of Nursing. (The TEAS is not required for the RN to BSN program.)
  4. Review immunization requirements listed on the School of Nursing website. Most immunizations are due with the application. Incomplete immunizations will result in the applicant being disqualified.
     

Students must complete 30 credit hours with a minimum 3.0 GPA and no grade less than a C, prior to making application to the School of Nursing. At least 20 credit hours must be from the nursing field of study below.

Required Courses
BIOL 2401Human Anatomy4
or BIOL 2403 Human Anatomy & Physiology I
BIOL 2402Human Physiology4
or BIOL 2404 Human Anatomy & Physiology II
BIOL 2420Intro Applied Microbiology4
CHEM 1406Inorganic & Envir Chemistry4
or CHEM 1411 General Chemistry I
MATH 1369Elementary Statistics3
or MATH 1370 Intro Biomedical Statistics
or STAT 1369 Elementary Statistics
PSYC 1301Introduction To Psychology3
PSYC 3374Development Psychology3
FACS 2362Nutrition3
Total Hours28

All natural science courses must be completed within 7 years of application to the School of Nursing.

Admission consideration to the School of Nursing requires an overall GPA of 3.0 in all degree requirements and a 3.0 GPA in all nursing field of study courses. All grades must be a 'C' or better.

Students must score a minimum of 70 on the ATI-TEAS for admission consideration. ATI-TEAS sub-scores must be a minimum of 55. The TEAS exam may be taken every 30 days prior to the application period in which you are applying. During the application period, the TEAS exam can only be taken one (1) time. Given multiple test scores for a nursing applicant, the student must select which test scores that will be used for the application.

If you meet the preliminary requirements for acceptance, you will receive instructions for completing a criminal background check and fingerprint scanning with the agency specified by the Texas Board of Nursing

Students are conditionally accepted pending satisfactory completion of drug screening and criminal background checks and any relevant courses in progress.

Once accepted, the following curriculum applies.

Required Courses
NURS 3310Health Assessment3
NURS 3340Older Adult Health Management3
NURS 3351Nursing Concepts I3
NURS 3360Introduction to Research3
NURS 3540Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing5
NURS 3620Adult Health 16
NURS 3631Nursing Fundamentals6
NURS 4030Community Nursing5
NURS 4060Leadership and Management4
NURS 4250Concepts in Nursing Practice II2
NURS 4520Nursing Care of Infants, Children & Adolescents5
NURS 4540Women's Hlth and Matern NB Nur5
NURS 4620Adult Health II6
Total Hours56

Excerpts from Texas Board of Nursing website and Petition for Declaratory Order Form

  • Applicants with eligibility issues (a positive criminal background screen and/or answering "yes" to questions 2-5) that could prevent them from taking the NCLEX examination, upon completion of a nursing program, must complete the eligibility review process.  If you have a positive criminal background screen, you will NOT be admitted into SHSU's Nursing program without an outcome letter from the Board of Nursing for the State of Texas stating that you have been granted permission to write the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). The eligibility review process permits the Board to make decisions regarding an applicant's eligibility for licensure prior to entering or completing a nursing program.  Effective January 2018, applicants should wait for the initial outcome letter (for those not receiving a blue card) before submitting a Declaratory Order.  However, they can submit paperwork in advance if they must also answer "yes" to questions 2-5. 
  • Further information:
    School of Nursing Application Process
    Texas Board of Nursing 

Health

Students must provide evidence of being in good physical health, free of disease, and of having received all required immunizations. Prior to beginning classes students must pass a criminal background and drug check.

Core Performance Standards for Admission and Progression
 

**** Please Read Carefully ****

Below are listed the performance standards of the professional nursing program. Applicants to the Sam Houston State University (SHSU) School of Nursing (SON) should read these standards carefully, and be sure that you can comply with them. The SHSU SON expects all applicants for admission to possess and demonstrate the skills, attributes, and qualities set forth below, without unreasonable dependence on technology or intermediaries.

Critical Thinking: Critical thinking ability sufficient for clinical judgment, sufficient powers of intellect to acquire, assimilate, apply, and evaluate information and solve problems. For example, identify cause-effect relationships in clinical situations; develop and implement nursing care plans according to the nursing process; respond without delay to emergency situations

Interpersonal: Interpersonal abilities sufficient enough for interaction with individuals, families, and groups from a variety of social, emotional, cultural, economic, and intellectual backgrounds. For example, Establish rapport with patients/clients, colleagues, and other health care professionals. Respect cultural diversity and the rights of others.

Communication: Communication abilities sufficient for interaction with others in verbal and written form. Utilizes effective communication skills to interact with patient/client, peers, and other health care personnel of various ages, cultural, economic, and intellectual backgrounds in a variety of settings. For example, read, write and speak English effectively so as to be understood. Explain treatment and procedures; provide health teaching to individual clients and groups of clients based on assessed needs, available resources, age, lifestyle and cultural considerations; documents and interprets nursing actions and patient/client responses. Communicate information accurately and effectively with other Schools, colleagues, clients, and client families. Evaluate written orders, care plans, and treatment requests.

Mobility: Ability to reach assigned clinical sites. Gross and fine motor abilities sufficient to provide safe and effective nursing care.  Sufficient physical abilities to function in the patient care settings, such as, physical health and stamina needed to carry out nursing procedures. Ability to calibrate and use equipment effectively. Ability to grasp small objects and perform electronic keyboarding/documentation. Ability to move around the patients/clients’ rooms, workspaces, treatment areas, and be able to move, position, and transport patients without causing harm, minimal pain, and discomfort for patient and staff alike.

Sensory: Sufficient use of the senses of vision, hearing, touch, and smell to observe, assess, and evaluate effectively (both close and at a distance) in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings.  For example, hear monitor alarms, emergency signals, auscultation sounds and cries for help. Observe patient/client responses. Perform tactile/palpation functions of physical examination or those functions related to therapeutic intervention, e.g., insertion of catheters and IVs for therapy.

Behavioral: Sufficient motivation, responsibility, and flexibility to function in new, ever-changing, and stressful environments.  Adapts appropriately to ever-changing needs of clients and client families.  Adapts to assignment change of patient, clinical, or laboratory area in a manner that allows the student to meet objectives while providing safe, adequate patient care. Accountable for clinical preparation and independent study. Performs nursing functions in a safe, responsible manner. Ability to recognize the need for further research and respond accordingly based on changes in patient/client status since assignment was made.

Student Organizations

Student Nursing Association

Students enrolled in the Nursing School and in pre-nursing courses are eligible to participate as members of the SHSU chapter of the Texas Nursing Students’ Association (TNSA). The TNSA is the student component of the American Nurses’ Association, a national professional nursing organization with state and local constituencies, and a subsidiary of the National Student Nurses’ Association (NSNA). Participation locally affords membership in the largest independent health organization in the nation and the only one for nursing students. TNSA offers numerous benefits to those students members. More information on meetings and activities can be obtained from the School of Nursing website.

Scholarships

SHSU offers scholarships to students in the School of Nursing. A complete list of scholarship opportunities can be found on the Scholarships for Kats webpage.  Search for nursing to identify competitive scholarships based on student performance in nursing and pre-requisite coursework. Assistance is also available through Financial Aid, including scholarships, loans, and grants outside of SHSU. Priority deadline for scholarships is November 1. You must complete the current year FAFSA  to be considered for nursing scholarships.

Nursing 

NURS 3310. Health Assessment. 3 Hours.

Students are presented the concepts and principles underlying assessment of the health status of individuals. An emphasis is placed on interviewing skills, health histories, and the physical and psychosocial findings in the well person, plus the development of communication in the nurse-client relationship and assessment skills. Students implement the nursing process by obtaining health histories, performing physical and psychosocial assessments, establishing a baseline database, and formulating initial nursing plans. (Class 2 hours weekly, Clinical/Lab 3 hours weekly.)
Prerequisite: Admission to SHSU nursing program.

NURS 3320. Pathophysiology for Nursing. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to pathophysiological alterations in major regulatory mechanisms of the body. Special consideration is given to the clinical application of pathophysiologic concepts and principles in professional nursing practice. A foundation is provided for understanding general nursing practice, various diagnostic procedures, and selected therapeutic regimens. Critical thinking, correct use of related terminology and effective decision-making are incorporated to provide safe care.
Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Nursing.

NURS 3321. Pharmacology for Nursing. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to pharmacological implications and related alterations in major regulatory mechanisms of the body. Special consideration is given to the clinical application of pharmacological concepts and principles in professional nursing practice. A foundation is provided for understanding nursing implications, basic drug classifications, and selected pharmacological therapies. Critical thinking and effective decision-making are incorporated to provide safe care.
Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Nursing.

NURS 3340. Older Adult Health Management. 3 Hours.

Students focus on nursing interventions used to promote, maintain, and restore health in older adult clients. Students are provided with opportunities to expand knowledge of the normal aging process; to identify variables that contribute to deviations in health; to discuss how formal and informal resources including evidence-based data contribute to older adults' health status; and to examine the implications of working collaboratively with individuals, families and communities to meet the health care needs of older adults. (Class: 2 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 6 hours weekly)
Prerequisite: Admission to SHSU nursing program.

NURS 3351. Nursing Concepts I. 3 Hours.

A variety of formal and informal resources including evidence-based data are used to orient students to the roles that nurses assume and the settings in which nursing practice meets the diverse health needs of clients. Standards of professional nursing practice and nursing theorists are introduced along with the philosophy of the School of Nursing.

NURS 3360. Introduction to Research. 3 Hours.

Students focus on fundamental concepts and processes of nursing research and emphasizes nursing research as a basis for evidence-based practice. Students examine major steps in the research process, formulate research questions relevant to clinical nursing practice, and critique nursing research reports. Admission to the BSN or RN-BSN program.
Prerequisite: NURS 3321 and Admission to the BSN or RN-BSN program.

NURS 3370. RN-to-BSN Role Transition. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to meet the needs of a registered nurse (RN) with a 2-year associate's degree or diploma who desires to earn a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree. In this course, students explore the role of the professional nurse as a provider of holistic, culturally sensitive, client-centered care. Other concepts explored include advocacy, evidence-based practice, care quality and safety, interdisciplinary communication and collaboration, genetics and genomics, and informatics. The significance of nursing theory as a basis for professional nursing practice and competency in applying nursing diagnoses is also explored.
Prerequisite: Admission to the RN-to-BSN Program.

NURS 3540. Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing. 5 Hours.

Students explore the relevance of psychosocial nursing concepts to all areas of professional practice with a conceptual integration of the nursing process, theories, and research from psychosocial sciences and humanities as these relate to the care of persons with mental disorders. Clinical experience provides an opportunity for application of psychosocial concepts and methods in using the nursing process to promote optimal levels of wellness for individuals, families, and target groups as well as provides students with the opportunity to develop clinical decision-making abilities when providing appropriate and culturally relevant psychiatric/mental health nursing care. (Class: 2 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 9 hours weekly) 5 Credit Hours.
Prerequisite: Admission to SHSU nursing program.

NURS 3620. Adult Health 1. 6 Hours.

Students are introduced to the use of the nursing process in the care of adults with chronic or non-complex illness, using a systems approach to discuss the effects of illness on the individual and family and to examine the disruption of growth and development patterns across the lifespan from young adult to senior years, emphasizing the nursing process to assist adults in reaching their optimal level of wellness. The course includes a clinical laboratory to allow the student the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to clinical practice in diverse adult populations. (Class: 3 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 9 hours weekly) 6 Credit Hours.
Prerequisite: Admission to SHSU nursing program.

NURS 3631. Nursing Fundamentals. 6 Hours.

Students are provided an introduction to the scope of human needs, use of the nursing process as a systematic approach to meeting those needs, and the role of the professional nurse in assisting individuals toward optimal health. Clinical settings are used in the application of fundamental concepts, principles of nursing, and communication skills that are employed in providing basic client care. (Semester totals: Class: 3 hours weekly and Clinical/Lab 9 hours weekly) 6 credit hours.
Prerequisite: Admission to SHSU nursing program .

NURS 3660. LVN-to-BSN Role Transition. 6 Hours.

This course meets the needs of a licensed vocational nurse (LVN) desiring to earn a bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN) and become a registered nurse (RN). Students explore the role of the professional nurse as a provider of holistic, culturally sensitive, client-centered care. Students apply critical thinking and the nursing process to clients experiencing non-complex common health problems. Other concepts include client advocacy, interdisciplinary collaboration, and professional nursing. (Class 4 hours weekly, Clinical/Lab 6 hours weekly.) Corequisite: NURS 3410, NURS 3320, and NURS 3321.
Prerequisite: Admission to the LVN to BSN Program.

NURS 4030. Community Nursing. 6 Hours.

Students focus on the synthesis of public health concepts within a preventive framework to promote and maintain the health of communities and includes an examination of the historical development, philosophy, health care systems, epidemiology, and nursing care of specific populations and groups in the community. Primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention are emphasized as they relate to the natural history of disease in individuals, families, and groups. A community health assessment is completed using census data, morbidity and mortality rates, epidemiologic and statistical methods, and community-based research. Progressively more independent behaviors are expected of students in community health practice. (Class: 3 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 9 hours weekly.) Variable Credit (1-6). For non-RN students - NURS 3360 with a C or better.
Prerequisite: For RN-BSN - Admission to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 4060. Leadership and Management. 6 Hours.

Students focus on the knowledge and skills related to the delivery of health services from a nursing management knowledge-base. Students are presented theories, concepts, and models of health care delivery. Students explore creative roles for managing and leading in nursing as well as gain theoretical knowledge and skills to understand organizations, understand leadership theories, and utilize critical thinking in making nursing management decisions. (Class: 2 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 12 hours weekly.) Variable Credit (1-6).
Prerequisite: For RN-BSN program - Admission to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 4092. Independent Study Nursing. 1-3 Hours.

Independent Study. Students engage in an individual study in specialized areas of nursing. To be directed and approved by the nursing advisor. Variable credit (1 to 3).
Prerequisite: Admission to SHSU nursing program.

NURS 4095. Special Topics in Nursing. 1-3 Hours.

Special Topics. Students engage in a group study in specialized areas of nursing. To be directed and approved by the nursing advisor. This course is designed to be a multi-topic course. Therefore, the student can take the course under various special topics being offered. Variable credit (1 to 3).
Prerequisite: Admission to SHSU nursing program.

NURS 4250. Concepts in Nursing Practice II. 2 Hours.

Students are provided the opportunity to synthesize issues, such as career development, health policy, and workplace advocacy, into their working method. Other issues including information technology, ethics, and cultural awareness (which have been previously introduced) are explored more thoroughly to assist the graduate's entry into practice. 2 Credit Hours.
Prerequisite: NURS 4030.

NURS 4372. RN-to-BSN Capstone. 3 Hours.

Students integrate the knowledge, theories, and concepts RN-to-BSN learned throughout the program. Students assimilate knowledge from nursing and related disciplines for analysis of a current health issue and the professional nurse's role in impacting change.
Prerequisite: NURS 3360 and NURS 4060.

NURS 4381. Legal & Ethical Issues in Nurs. 3 Hours.

Students explore current ethical and legal issues that affect the nursing profession as well as past and present legal issues that affect nursing. Students learn about various theories and tools that can be used to assist them in resolving ethical dilemmas.
Prerequisite: Admission to the RN-BSN Program.

NURS 4382. Informatics. 3 Hours.

Students learn to integrate nursing science and computer technology in order to identify, collect, process, and manage information. Course emphasis is placed on health applications that support clinical, administrative, research, and educational decision making as well as enhance the efficacy of nursing processes.
Prerequisite: Admission to the RN-BSN Program.

NURS 4383. Rural Health Nursing. 3 Hours.

Students explore the various unique healthcare needs, trends, and issues faced by rural settings. Students have an opportunity to explore possible solutions to healthcare problems as they examine evidence-based data in the literature. Rural nursing theories are applied to standards of professional nursing practice.
Prerequisite: Admission to the RN-BSN Program.

NURS 4384. Nursing Genetics and Genomics. 3 Hours.

Students study health promotion and maintenance for individuals and families within the context of human diversity and the implications for best practices associated with genomic information, including ethics and genetic counseling. Students learn about the genomic determinants of health.
Prerequisite: Admission to RN-BSN program.

NURS 4520. Nursing Care of Infants, Children & Adolescents. 5 Hours.

Students uses the nursing process to promote, protect, and maintain the health of infants, children, and adolescents, providing students with the knowledge and skills needed to develop the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills necessary for therapeutic interventions of these populations. Students examine the biological and psychosocial parameters; legal and ethical dimensions; resources; and cultural influences affecting nursing care strategies for infants, children, and adolescents. (Class: 3 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 6 hours weekly) 5 Credit Hours. .
Prerequisite: Admission to SHSU nursing program.

NURS 4540. Women's Hlth and Matern NB Nur. 5 Hours.

Students examine childbearing families and women?s health in normal and high-risk situations and the role of the nurse in meeting health needs of women, families, and their newborns. Supervised clinical experiences and/or simulation experiences in the application of the nursing process in meeting these health needs are offered and promotes the acquisition of skills in caring for women, families, and newborns during uncomplicated and/or complicated health experiences in a variety of settings. (Class: 2 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 6 hours weekly) 4 Credit Hours.
Prerequisite: Admission to SHSU nursing program.

NURS 4620. Adult Health II. 6 Hours.

Senior students are presented critical thinking and problem-solving strategies for care of adults with acute or complex illness and injuries. The effects of acute illness are examined in relation to the injury as well as in relation to the individual's developmental stage, culture, and gender. Building on the Nursing Care of Adults Health I, a systems approach is used to analyze and intervene in alterations to the health of the individual and family and to help them reach their optimal level of wellness. The course includes clinical laboratory to allow the student the opportunity to integrate theoretical concepts into clinical practice in diverse populations. (Class: 3 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 9 hours weekly) 6 Credit Hours.
Prerequisite: Admission to SHSU nursing program.

Director/Chair: Cheryl Denise Neill

Marianne Frances Moore, PHD, Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, PHD, Univ of Texas HSC-Houston; MSN, Univ of San Diego; BS, Rutgers University

Cheryl Denise Neill, PHD, Associate Professor and Chair of Nursing, School of Nursing, PHD, Texas Woman's University; MSN, Univ of Central Arkansas; BS, Univ of Central Arkansas

Eloria Simon-Campbell, PHD, Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, PHD, Univ of Texas At Tyler; MSN, Univ of Texas At Tyler; BSN, Prairie View A&M University

Anne Scott Stiles, PHD, Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, PHD, Texas Woman's University; MSN, Oral Roberts University; BSN, Ohio State Univ

Clinical Faculty

Lilibeth Claudio Al-Kofahy, PHD, Clinical Associate Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, PHD, University of Queensland (The); MN, Victoria University; MAN, Far Eastern University; BSN, MV Gallego Foundation Colleges

Lindsey Brooke Beatty, MSN, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Loyola Univ-New Orleans; BS, Sam Houston State University; BS, Sam Houston State University

Tania Celia, MSN, Visiting Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Widener University-Pa; BS, Rutgers University

April Henry Cobbs, MS, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, MS, Western Governors University; BS, Western Governors University

Tonia Denise Cobbs, MS, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, MS, Western Governors University; BS, Western Governors University

Mona C Cockerham, PHD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, PHD, Univ of Texas HSC-Houston; MSN, Univ of Texas HSC-Houston; BS, Louisiana College

Angelique Lynn Cunningham, MS, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, MS, Western Governors University; BS, Western Governors University

Kathryn Poole Deshotels, MSN, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Univ of Tx Health Science Cntr; BSN, Univ of S Carolina-Columbia; BS, McNeese State University

Deborah Lovett Duncan, MSN, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, University of Phoenix; MAED, Univ of Alabama-Birmingham; BSN, Univ of Alabama-Birmingham

Jennifer Ifeyiwa Edeogu, MSN, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Univ. of Texas-Med-Galveston; BS, Lamar University

Rhonda Lane Gatti, MSN, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Univ of Houston-Victoria; BSN, Loyola Univ-New Orleans; BA, Univ of South Alabama

Robert G Harmon, MSN, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Univ of Texas HSC-Houston; BSN, Austin Peay State University

Judie Lynn Haubrich-Theriot, MSN, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Univ of Houston-Victoria; BSN, Univ of Texas HSC-Houston

Tara K Hill, MSN, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Univ. of Texas-Med-Galveston; BSN, Texas Tech Univ-Hlth Sci Cntr; BSED, Baylor University

Linda Sue James, MS, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, MS, University of Toronto; BSN, University of Western Ontario

Angela Faith Jarrell, PHD, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, PHD, Texas Woman's University; MSN, Duquesne University; BSN, Univ of Tx Health Science Cntr

Desha Johnson Makiya, PHD, Visiting Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, PHD, Univ of Texas At Tyler; MBA, University of Phoenix; BS, Alcorn State University

Jaimee Brooke Kastler, PHD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, PHD, Walden University; MSN, Walden University; AS, Excelsior College

Diane Langton, DNP, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, DNP, Univ of Tx Health Science Cntr; MS, Syracuse University; BA, Suny At Binghamton

Brett R. Merkley, MSN, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, University of Phoenix; BSN, Idaho State University

Laura Kemp Montgomery, MSN, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Univ of Tx Health Science Cntr; MA, Sam Houston State University; BSN, Univ of Tx Health Science Cntr; BS, Kent State University

Vivian Helga Nowazek, PHD, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, PHD, Univ of Texas HSC-Houston; MSN, Univ of Texas HSC-Houston; BN, University of Manitoba

Patricia Anne Obulaney, DNP, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, DNP, Univ of Incarnate Word; MSN, Univ of Tx Health Science Cntr; BSN, Prairie View A&M University

Christian Paige Owen, MSN, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Univ of Texas HSC-Houston; BSN, Univ of Texas HSC-Houston

Melissa Janette Silvera, MSN, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Grand Canyon Univ.; BSN, Grand Canyon Univ.

Pamela Forester Slagle, MSN, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, University of Phoenix; BS, Univ of Mary Hardin Baylor

Andrea Marie Smith, PHD, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, PHD, Univ of Texas-Arlington; MSN, Baylor University; BSN, Univ of Texas Medical Branch; BA, Southern Illinois U-Carbondale

Judy Carol Upshaw, MSN, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Univ of Texas-Arlington; BSN, Univ of Texas-Arlington

Melissa Marie Vander Stucken, MSN, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, MSN, Walden University; BSN, Texas Tech University

Caterina LoGalbo Voges, MS, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, MS, Indiana University of Pennsyl; BSN, Carlow College

Susan Keaton Weimer, MS, Lecturer of Nursing, School of Nursing, MS, Western Governors University; BS, Western Governors University

Kelly Kristine Zinn, PHD, Clinical Associate Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, PHD, Loyola Univ-Chicago; MS, Univ of Nebraska Med Center; BSN, Clarkson College