Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology

Chair: Erin Orrick, Ph.D.

Contact Information: (936) 294-3643 or Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology

Website: Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology

About

Be part of a top ranked Criminal Justice and Criminology program! Our on-line graduate degree programs were ranked #2 in the United States in 2020 by U.S. News and World Report. Graduate programs in our department educate students with a variety of interests. Degrees target student interests that range from advancing criminal justice knowledge and practice through research to career development within the criminal justice system. Our Department offers specialized graduate degree programs for criminal justice professionals to grow their leadership and management skills and broaden their knowledge base.

Faculty members in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology are among the most productive and skilled educators in the country. From faculty who are nationally ranked researchers to those who have extensive backgrounds as criminal justice professionals, faculty members are dedicated to guiding students through foundational courses to develop their skills in reasoning and analysis. Students have the opportunity to learn from the best in foundational areas of criminal justice such as policing, corrections, and the law to emerging areas of knowledge in biosocial criminology. Students interested in conducting original research can continue their education through the Ph.D. in Criminal Justice.

As a graduate student in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at SHSU, the opportunities are endless:

  • Learn from faculty who conduct research in all aspects of the criminal justice system
  • Study in top ranked Doctoral, M.A. and on-line M.S. programs
  • Observe valuable interaction and professional development that occurs in the College of Criminal Justice Institutes with executives in policing and corrections from across Texas and around the country
  • Participate in applied, action research that has "real world" implications 
  • Become a member of one of our Undergraduate Student Organizations or our Graduate Student Organization
  • Experience affordable living
  • Competitive Scholarships and Graduate Assistantships are available

Mission

The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology is committed to providing students with a quality liberal arts education. Students will gain an appreciation for their role as criminal justice professionals and as contributing members of society. The Department is committed to producing high quality research and to providing public service and technical assistance to communities and criminal justice agencies.

Contact Information

General Information on CJC undergraduate programs: CJ Advising or 936-294-4444

General Information on CJC graduate programs: Doris Pratt, Graduate Coordinator, (936) 294-3637

Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology Administration:

  • Dr. Ling Ren, Director of CJC Graduate Programs, 936-294-4941

Academic Programs

The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology offers a PhD in Criminal Justice, two distinct degrees at the master's level, and a graduate certificate in Criminal Justice Leadership and Management. The Department offers online criminal justice degree programs for a range of prospective students.

For a listing of the programs offered within the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, please, reference the Programs tab on this page.

Highlights

SHSU’s College of Criminal Justice has been consistently ranked among the top criminal justice programs in the nation in both value and quality by U.S. News & World Report, the Journal of Criminal Justice, BestColleges.com, and many other publications.

Student Organization and Activities

Graduate Student Organization (GSO)

The mission of GSO is to bring together graduate students at the College of Criminal Justice; to facilitate and encourage research and theory development related to criminal justice; to encourage appropriate and effective teaching techniques and practices for criminal justice courses; and to serve as a resource network for and to encourage interaction among the various entities within the College of Criminal Justice. See the College of Criminal Justice GSO website for additional information.

Scholarships

Scholarships,  assistantships, and financial assistance are available. Student assistantships and scholarships are awarded on a competitive basis based upon academic performance, GRE scores, letters of recommendation, among other factors.

Financial awards are available, including out-of-state tuition waivers. University policy requires all students to pay in-state tuition.

Information on specific scholarships available in the College of Criminal Justice are available through Cutty Gilbert at (936) 294-3755. Potential graduate students should contact Doris Pratt at (936) 294-3637. See also the College of Criminal Justice section for information on College and University level scholarships.

Criminal Justice

CRIJ 5330. Critical Analys Of Justice Adm. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 530); Students engage in an analysis of the criminal justice system in the United States that covers the role of justice agencies as part of societal response to crime, the knowledge base of the criminal justice system, issues, problems, and trends.

CRIJ 5332. Perspectives In Criminology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 532); Students survey the field of criminology that emphasizes perspectives regarding the making of law, breaking of law, and societal responses to the breaking of law.

CRIJ 5334. Courts As Organizations. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 534); Students engage in a critical evaluation of the dispensing of justice in the United States, using a systems theory approach and current court policy.

CRIJ 5363. The Juvenile Offender. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 563); Students explore theoretical perspectives regarding the causes and correlates of juvenile offending. Particular attention is paid to the role of family, peers, and school.

CRIJ 5367. Gender and Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Students explore the role of gender in offending, victimization, and criminal justice processing as well as evaluate the influence of gender on working in criminal justice professions. Criminological and victimological theories are assessed in light of gender and the relationship between gender and criminal justice as drawn from both the social and biological sciences.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 5364.

CRIJ 5372. Community Based Corrections. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 572); Students are provided an overview of techniques and procedures used in the supervision of adult and juvenile probationers and parolees and other residents of community-based corrections facilities in addition to the preparation of social history, pre-hearing, and pre-sentence investigation reports. An emphasis is placed on practical problems confronting the probation and parole officers.

CRIJ 5392. Survey Of Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Students examine the theory and application of social science research techniques and designs, with a focus on the interpretation and use of research findings. Students who have not completed an introductory course in research methods within the past five years must take CRIJ 3378 as a prerequisite.

CRIJ 5393. Legl Aspects Criminal Just Sys. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 593); Students study the aspects of law which are relevant to and essential for a better understanding of the criminal justice system and its related processes.

CRIJ 6093. Independent Studies in CJ. 1-3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 693);This course is designed for the directed study of individual students who wish to engage in intensive study in some specific area of research. Variable Credit (1-3). .
Prerequisite: Consent of the Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs of the College and of the instructor directing the readings.

CRIJ 6099. Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 699); The completion and defense of the Thesis. (The student must be registered in 6099 the semester in which he/she receives his/her master's degree.) Variable Credit (1-3).

CRIJ 6332. Resource Development in the Organizational Context. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 632); Students explore critical issues and strategic questions regarding managing human resources in criminal justice agencies. Policy areas discussed are: (1) employee influence; (2) human resource flow; (3) reward systems; and (4) work systems. Human resource management as a coherent, proactive management model.

CRIJ 6333. Seminar In Org & Administratn. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 633); Students study the bureaucracy and complex organizations with a strong emphasis on the concepts and practices of the organization and management of public agencies in the United States. Special consideration is given to the various philosophies, typologies, and models of administrative systems in criminal justice.

CRIJ 6334. Resrch Mthd & Quantve Analysis. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 634);Students explore the methods and techniques of research and research design; conducting and assessing research in the criminal justice agency management environment; translation of research findings to policy; and informational resources readily available to the agency manager. This course is designed to prepare students to gather decision-relevant information.

CRIJ 6335. Seminar In Leadership & Mgt. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 635); Students explore problems and alternative solutions in criminal justice management. The case study method and current readings provide an admixture of practical and educational experiences intended to foster and disseminate new ideas for management strategies, especially as this is impacted by leadership styles, human resources, and the environment.

CRIJ 6336. Comp/Tech Applications For CJ. 3 Hours.

Students examine the techniques of data processing with emphasis upon utilization and application to criminal justice information management.

CRIJ 6339. Police In Society. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 639); Students examine the evolution of police in modern society with a special emphasis given to the role of the police play in contemporary society. Current research examining the function of the police will be examined.

CRIJ 6360. Seminar In Deviant Behav. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 660); Students analyze behavior which violates expectations that are shared and recognized as legitimate. Special attention is focused on societal reactions to such behavior.

CRIJ 6361. Social Policy. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 661); Students evaluate the legal, social, economic, philosophic, and controversial issues of governmental programs, administered by federal, state, local units of government, and the client systems served.

CRIJ 6363. Leadrshp Psy In C J Management. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 663); Students examine the important psychological processes that are involved in dealing with others. The manner in which an individual's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by others, especially in a criminal justice leadership environment, is the focal point.

CRIJ 6365. Comm Theory & Admin Of Justice. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 665); Students examine the nature of criminal justice organizations as components of the political, social, and economic inter-organizational networks that comprise communities. Topics such as the intersection of criminal justice, mental health, juvenile justice and educational systems are examined. The impact of criminal victimization and attributes of communities that foster crime are examined in detail. The processes that motivate and implement change in community-based organizations are also addressed.

CRIJ 6368. Semnr Drugs,Society,Policy Iss. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 668); Students focus on issues and problems surrounding the problem of illicit drugs in society. Particular emphasis is placed on policy related issues.

CRIJ 6372. Seminar In Crim & Corrections. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 672); Students explore theory and problems in Criminology and Corrections. One or more term papers evidencing qualities of scholarship will be required.

CRIJ 6385. Stats For C J Research. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 685); Students review descriptive and graphical techniques for criminal justice and criminological research, including probability and sampling theory, the normal curve and statistical inference, Central Limit Theorem, Chi-square, T and F distributions, analysis of variance, and linear regression.

CRIJ 6386. Stats for CJ Research II. 3 Hours.

Students cover statistical analyses and techniques such as reliability tests, factor analysis, and multiple imputation. Various modeling strategies are also covered, including logistic regression, ordinal regression, Poisson regression, and negative binomial regression.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 6385.

CRIJ 6387. The Ethics Of Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 687); Students explore ethics and moral philosophy in criminal justice, including the role of natural law, constitutional law, code of ethics, and philosophical principles. Strong emphasis is placed on examining the role of justice in a free society and the practical implications of justice to practitioners of police, courts, and corrections.

CRIJ 6388. Emergent Issues In CJ Leadrshp. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 688); This course serves as a capstone course for the Master of Science in Criminal Justice Leadership program, providing an opportunity for the integration of information offered in the program and its relationship to emergent issues. Students address the effect of emergent perspectives in organization theory on public administration in general and more specifically upon criminal justice management and leadership. Students examine the impact of emergent technology upon criminal justice operations as well as study the integration of organization theory, principles of public administration, and community expectations of criminal justice leaders.

CRIJ 6392. Program Evaluation In CJ. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 692); Students study the principles and techniques of program evaluation, including models and case studies.

CRIJ 6394. Special Topics-Criminal Justce. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 694); This course is needed to offer master's level students the option of registering for a multi-topic course. Students can take the course under various special topics being offered.

CRIJ 6396. Legal Aspects Of CJ Management. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 696); Students are provided an overview of the legal issues commonly facing managers in criminal justice agencies. Particular emphasis is placed on public employment law including the hiring, promoting, disciplining and discharging of employees, fair employment practices, and agency and administrator civil liability. Both state and federal statutory and case law are examined.

CRIJ 6398. Thesis Practicum. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 698); Students are provided an overview of research strategies; principles of research writing; and procedures for initiating, executing, and completing a Thesis. Preparation and approval of a Prospectus. (Preliminary planning for the Thesis should begin during the first semester of graduate work; the student should enroll in CRIJ 6398 after he/she has completed 12 semester hours of graduate work.)

CRIJ 7070. Independent Studies in CJ. 1-3 Hours.

Directed readings designed to give the student flexibility in developing an area of specialization. Variable Credit (1-3). A student can take only two CRIJ 7070 courses.
Prerequisite: Enrollment requires prior permission of the appropriate Dean and the supervising faculty which is given only when necessary to meet specific needs of the student and the College.

CRIJ 7330. Seminar In Organization Theory. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 730); Students examine organizational thought with application to criminal justice as well as analyze the developmental state of organizational theory, including historical derivations and the implications of various theoretical bases for organizational functioning.

CRIJ 7333. Proseminar In C.J. Issues. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 733); This course is designed to give doctoral students a current, thorough, and comprehensive review of the criminal justice system with a focus on how the system functions in theory and practice and current future needs and trends. Students are required to submit extensive critiques and to participate in panel discussions.

CRIJ 7334. Smnr In American Policing. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 734); Students examine the philosophy and role of policing in the United States, politics of policing, managing police organizations, police community relations, police operational and administrative practices, police research, police executive development, emergent issues and problems in policing.

CRIJ 7336. Seminar In American Correction. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 736); Students engage in an in-depth examination of the various issues and problems in corrections as they relate to administration and management. A variety of problems is explored, including the philosophical justification for prisons, personnel management, sentencing and its implications, community-based corrections, rehabilitation, judicial intervention, and correctional reform.

CRIJ 7337. Criminological Theory. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 737); Students are provided an overview of the major paradigms focusing on the causes of crime and deviant behavior with special attention given to the social, political, and intellectual background, which each perspective arose. The course includes a discussion of criminological theories from a philosophy of science perspective focusing on issues such as theory construction, theoretical integration, and the formal evaluation of theory.

CRIJ 7338. Seminar In American Courts. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 738); Students examine the role and structure of prosecution, public defense, and the courts in the United States jurisprudence with emphasis upon criminal law and problems in the administration of justice.

CRIJ 7339. Distr & Correlates Of Crime. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 739); Students engage in a survey of research on the scope and nature of criminal activity and factors correlated with criminal behavior. Attention specifically on four general categories: race/ethnicity, gender, age, and class. Students examine the issues of etiology, victimology, differential police enforcement, sentencing, and correctional practices.

CRIJ 7340. Administration of Justice. 3 Hours.

Students in this advanced seminar address criminal justice systems theory, discretionary decision-making in criminal justice, and factors related to differences and discrimination in system processing.

CRIJ 7360. Adv Smnr In Criminological Thr. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 760). Students engage in extensive studies in areas of classical and/or current criminological theory. A basic knowledge of criminology is assumed. Emphasis is placed on analytical, critical evaluation, and the advancement of theory.

CRIJ 7366. Seminar on Penalty of Death. 3 Hours.

Students examine the death penalty with a focus on areas of research needed in order to better evaluate the appropriateness of this sanction. This course includes: 1) a specific focus on the death penalty from a variety of different perspectives; 2) a critical examination of the existing body of scholarship; and 3) the identification of what is needed for evolving scholarship in each area.

CRIJ 7371. Special Topics-Criminal Justce. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 771). This course is needed to offer doctoral level students the option of registering for a multi-topic course. The student can take the course under various special topics being offered.

CRIJ 7373. Research Practicum. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 773); Students engage in supervised training, including special applications in information acquisition, storage, retrieval, analysis, and display in criminal justice.

CRIJ 7375. Seminar in Legal Aspects of CJ. 3 Hours.

Students address legal research, constitutional law, criminal procedure, criminal law, and juvenile justice as relevant to understanding the criminal justice system and its related processes.

CRIJ 7387. Research Design. 3 Hours.

Students engage in advanced study of scientific inquiry with an emphasis on the practical aspects of research design and implementation. Topics may include the philosophy of science; the relationship of sampling theory to statistical theory; studies in causation; non-experimental research; data systems and modern data processing techniques.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 7434 and consent of instructor.

CRIJ 7389. Advanced Statistics II. 3 Hours.

Students engage in a survey of reliability analysis, loglinear, and logit loglinear analysis, nonlinear, weighted and two stage least-squares regression, probit analysis, survival analysis and Cox regression.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 7434.

CRIJ 7393. Computer Based Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to develop proficiency in data analysis using computerized statistical programs such as SPSS. Statistical theory and research design issues are combined with hands-on computer experience. The course emphasizes data management, multivariate statistics, and diagnostics.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 1387, CRIJ 7389, and CRIJ 7434.

CRIJ 7442. Advanced Statistics I. 4 Hours.

Students are introduced to multivariate statistical techniques, including multiple regression, logistic regression, discriminate analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, canonical correlation, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and multidimensional scaling.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 6385 or equivalent in past years.

CRIJ 8099. Dissertation IV. 1-3 Hours.


Prerequisite: CRIJ 8396, CRIJ 8397, and CRIJ 8398.

CRIJ 8396. Dissertation. 3 Hours.

CRIJ 8397. Dissertation II. 3 Hours.


Prerequisite: CRIJ 8396.

CRIJ 8398. Dissertation III. 3 Hours.


Prerequisite: CRIJ 8396 and CRIJ 8397.

Director/Chair: William M Wells

Andia B Azimi, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Georgia State University; MS, Georgia State University; BS, Georgia State University

Danielle Lynne Boisvert, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology; Associate Dean, COCJ, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Cincinnati; MFS, George Washington University; BS, University of Western Ontario

Wyatt Dandle Brown, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of South Florida; MS, Univ of Louisville; BS, Univ of Alabama-Birmingham

Eric J Connolly, PHD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Florida State University; MS, Univ of North Alabama; BA, West Virginia University

Miltonette Olivia Craig, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Florida State University; JD, Georgia State University; MS, Florida Int'L Univ; BA, Spelman College; BA, Spelman College

Steven Cuvelier, PHD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Ohio State Univ; MA, Univ of Northern Iowa; BS, Iowa State University

Jared Romeo Dmello, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Lowell; MA, Univ of Lowell; MA, California St Un-San Bernardin; BA, Univ of Hawaii At Manoa

Randall L Garner, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology and Associate Dean, COCJ, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Houston-Main; MA, Univ of Houston-Clear Lake; BS, Univ of Houston-Clear Lake

Jurg Gerber, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Washington State University; MA, Washington State University; BA, Eastern Washington University

Cassandra Mary Frances Gonzalez, MA, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, MA, Univ of Colorado; BA, Univ of Colorado

Jason R Ingram, PHD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Michigan State University; MA, Southern Illinois U-Carbondale; BA, Southern Illinois U-Carbondale

Stuti Subbaiah Kokkalera, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Northwestern University; LLM, Georgetown University; LLB, Gujarat University

Peter Scott Lehmann, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Florida State University; MS, Florida State University; BA, Furman University

Dennis R Longmire, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Maryland-College Park; MA, Univ of Maryland-College Park; BS, Towson State University; BS, Towson State University

Holly A Miller, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Florida State University; MA, Morehead State University; BA, Bethel College

Janet Lynne Mullings, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Associate Dean, COCJ, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Sam Houston State University; MA, Sam Houston State University; BS, Sam Houston State University

Chelsey Samara Narvey, BA, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, BA, Concordia University

John Charles Navarro, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Louisville; MS, Illinois State University; BS, Illinois State University

Willard M Oliver, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, West Virginia University; MA, West Virginia University; MS, Radford University; BS, Radford University

Erin Anderson Orrick, PHD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Texas At Dallas; MA, Univ of Maryland-College Park; BSCJ, Texas Christian University

Javier Ramos, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Florida State University; MS, Florida State University

Ryan Wayne Randa, PHD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Cincinnati; MS, Univ of Cincinnati; BS, Univ of Wisconsin-Superior

Jonathan Chimaobim Reid, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Florida State University; MS, Florida State University; BA, Univ of Alabama-Tuscaloosa; BA, Univ of Alabama-Tuscaloosa

Ling Ren, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Nebraska-Omaha; MS, People's Public Security Univ; BA, People's Public Security Univ

Mitchel P Roth, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Calif-Santa Barbara; MA, Univ of Calif-Santa Barbara; BA, Univ of Maryland-College Park

Elisa Luca Toman, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of South Florida; MS, Univ of Central Florida; BA, Univ of Miami

Michael Scott Vaughn, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Sam Houston State University; MS, University of Central Missouri; BS, University of Central Missouri

William M Wells, PHD, Professor and Chair of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Nebraska-Omaha; MA, Indiana University-Bloomington; BA, Ohio University

Yan Zhang, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Michigan State University; MS, Michigan State University; MS, Michigan State University; BS, Wuhan University

Jihong Zhao, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Washington State University; MA, Washington State University; BA, Shanghai Inst of Higher Edu

Interim Faculty

Mary Magdalene Breaux, PHD, Associate Professor of Practice of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Prairie View A&M University; MA, Webster University; BS, Sam Houston State University

Jay O Coons, PHD, Assistant Professor of Practice of Criminal Justice, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Sam Houston State University; MS, Sam Houston State University; BS, Sam Houston State University