Department of Art

Chair: Michael Henderson   (936) 294-1314

Website: Department of Art 

The Department of Art offers opportunities for creative students to explore and develop proficiencies in many traditional art forms, such as drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, ceramics, and photography. New and innovative art forms are also promoted in the Department of Art. Digital media courses are offered in graphic design, computer animation, and photography. Traditional and new media programs are supported by the Art History program, which provides concepts in aesthetics and art theory from diverse cultures and time periods.

Mission

The mission of the Sam Houston State University Department of Art is to teach skills, techniques, aesthetic principles and concepts that develop students personally and help to prepare them for professional careers in art and design as well as postgraduate study. We foster a vibrant environment for creative research and collaboration between faculty, students, and the community.

Highlights

All of the degree programs in the Department of Art are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

The Department has over 30,000 square feet of space devoted to studios, laboratories, lecture halls and galleries. Studios for painting, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking, and photography are equipped with the best tools available for students to develop skills and express ideas. Digital labs maintain state-of-the-art computer equipment for students in graphics, photography and computer animation.

Visiting artists from around the U.S. exhibit their work in the Gaddis Geeslin Gallery and give public lectures, workshops, and critiques for students. Individual studio space is available for advanced students in the Studio Art and Photography programs. The department operates the Satellite Gallery, devoted to exhibitions of student work in downtown Huntsville. Students in the Department of Art have the opportunity to take the New York Art Trip every fall and also have study abroad opportunities every summer.

Program Specific Requirements

Studio classes in computer animation, graphic design, photography, and studio art meet six clock hours per week each semester for three credit hours. Art history lecture classes meet for three clock hours per week.

All art students, including transfer students, must take W.A.S.H. (ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315) as a prerequisite for other art courses.

After completing the Art Foundation courses (see below), students must pass the BFA Portfolio Review to continue in a BFA program. The BA in Art does not require the BFA Portfolio Review. For more details regarding the BFA Portfolio Review, please refer to the degree plans.

Students must have a 3.0 GPA or higher in art courses to graduate with a BFA degree.

All undergraduate students are required to complete at least six hours of Writing Enhanced Courses within the discipline, of which three hours must be advanced.

Seniors are required to exhibit their work publicly as part of the capstone class in each BFA program.

Prerequisites for all ARTS courses require a grade of C or higher.

2020-2021 Application -- All students entering the Department of Art as majors in Art, Animation, Graphic Design, Photography, or Studio Art for the 2020 – 2021 academic calendar must submit an application to the Department of Art after completing the University admission application. The deadline for Art program applications is earlier than the University deadline. The application for Art programs is found on the Department of Art website

Laptop Requirement

Art students are required to own a Mac laptop as specified by their chosen program of study. Mac laptops are a required material for W.A.S.H. students. Financial Aid may adjust funding for qualified art students for the purchase of required hardware and software. Students must complete the financial aid application and qualify for financial aid. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for details. For current laptop and software requirements, go to Laptop Requirements for more information

Teacher Certification in Art

To become certified to teach art in a public school in the State of Texas, students will pursue an All-Level Certification in Art by following the degree plan for one of the BFA programs in art and adding a minor in secondary education. The required education courses (including six hours of student teaching) are:

Secondary Education Course Requirements
CISE 3384The Teaching Profession3
CISE 4364Mth Tch Secondary Schools3
CISE 4378Content Literacy3
CISE 4379Differentiated Pedagogy3
CISE 4380Respon Of Pro Educator3
CISE 4394Creatng Env For Lrng-Secondary3
CISE 4396Std Tch Secondary Classroom3
CISE 4397Std Tch Secondary Classroom3

To complete the requirements for certification, students must pass two (2) TExES certification exams. Before receiving permission to take the exams, students must pass the BFA Portfolio Review and have at least a 3.0 GPA in art courses. 

For more information about Teacher Certification and the Secondary Education Minor, see the website for Educator Preparation Services.

Curriculum

BFA Degrees

The BFA is the professional degree in art. BFA programs are offered in Studio Art (2D and 3D Tracks), Computer Animation, Graphic Design, and Photography. All of the BFA degrees in the department require a foundation of courses that emphasizes the principles of design, basic techniques, mark making, spatial organization, gestalt theories and principles, and color theories. These principles, ideas, and skills are put into practice in projects that require creative problem solving, individual solutions, and personal expression.  After completing the Art Foundation courses and the BFA Portfolio Review, students take the BFA Core, a common core of art classes that includes courses in 2D, 3D, and time-based mediums. The BFA Core provides opportunities to practice and develop the skills and ideas acquired in the Art Foundation courses. Expertise in specific disciplines is then further developed in the remaining upper-level Major courses in each BFA program.

Art Foundation
ARTS 1313W.A.S.H. - 2D3
ARTS 1314W.A.S.H. - 3D3
ARTS 1315W.A.S.H. - Lecture3
ARTS 1316Drawing3
ARTS 2313Foundations In Digital Art3
Total Hours15
BFA Core
ARTS 1303Art History Survey I 13
ARTS 2317Life Drawing I3
ARTS 2375Photographic Concepts3
ARTS 3305Painting I3
ARTS 3307Performance and Video Art3
or ARTS 3310 Printmaking
ARTS 3318Sculpture I3
ARTS 3385Art History Survey II3
Total Hours21

For complete curricular information, refer to the individual BFA degree plans.

BA Degree

The BA is a liberal arts degree that requires fourteen hours (four semesters) of a foreign language and a minor. Students in the BA program do not have to complete the BFA Portfolio Review.

For complete curricular information, refer to the BA degree plan.

Student Organizations

The Student Art Association (SAA) is a student-motivated organization that provides students with opportunities to create a community environment and form a strong network among their peers. The SAA is dedicated to student development, member exhibitions, technical/creative workshops, field trips, and promotion of student work. 

SHSU SIGGRAPH is an organization of students interested in computer animation, computer-generated imagery, and interactive techniques. SIGGRAPH members work together on independent animated projects and games, support one another by sharing techniques and knowledge, travel to visit professional game and animation studios, and have the opportunity to attend the national SIGGRAPH conference in the summer.

Student Design Collective (SDC), is a graphic design organization whose goal is to enhance classroom learning and develop professional relationships in order to assist students now and in their future careers. SDC intends to help better prepare students for real world applications and work environments, as well as promote interest and appreciation of graphic design through events, hands-on workshops, and community involvement.

Drawing Club is an organization for students interested in the art and practice of drawing. The club meets regularly to discuss drawing used in many applications—including comic books, scientific illustrations, and fine art—and organizes Open Drawing Sessions, which feature live models and meet outside of regular class times in departmental studio spaces.

Internships, Research, and Community Engagement

The Department of Art is committed to providing opportunities for students to work as interns in professional environments in the fields of graphic design and computer animation. Photography and studio art majors have opportunities to intern or volunteer at art centers and community organizations. Students actively engage the community through ACE (Academic Community Engagement) courses, public exhibitions, and screening of their work both on and off campus. For more information about community engagement and internships, contact the Department Chair.

Scholarships

Scholarships are available from both the Department of Art and the university to support a student’s study. 

The Department of Art Scholarships include:

  • Art Endowment
  • Clem Otis
  • Distinguished Faculty Scholarship
  • Elkins Lake Kuntz-Nelson
  • Emmette Jackson
  • Hal Fulgham Scholarship
  • James B. and Marilyn C. Shepard
  • Kenneth Zonker 
  • Madison Wolfe
  • Marion St. John Baker
  • Majorie Leverton Boehme
  • Ruth Wynne Thomason Hollinshead
  • Stanley E. Lea
  • Weldon Hall Jr. 

Departmental scholarships are available to full time art students. The Weldon Hall Jr. Scholarship is available to incoming freshmen. More information may be obtained by visiting the Department of Art scholarships web page or calling (936) 294-1315.  Information on university scholarships may be obtained at Office of Academic Scholarships or telephone (936) 294-1672.

ARTS 1301. Intro To The Visual Arts. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced the visual elements of art, their nature, functions, and relationships in Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture to the non-major.
Prerequisite: Non-Majors only.

ARTS 1302. Exploring Contemporary Art. 3 Hours.

This course includes a critical analysis of major themes in contemporary art, providing students with an appreciation of the artifacts of human imagination. Through the processes of synthesis and interpretation, students engage in critical, creative, and innovative communication about contemporary works of art.

ARTS 1303. Art History Survey I. 3 Hours.

Students are provided with a chronological survey of major artworks, sculpture, and architecture from the Prehistoric Period to the late Middle Ages.

ARTS 1304. Digital Art & New Technology. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to the practice of digital art and design in the age of social media and mobile devices. The emphasis is on digital imaging as a medium for artistic expression. Non-majors only.

ARTS 1313. W.A.S.H. - 2D. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to the studio arts, art history, theory, and technology. The course is designed to immerse students in an intense program of researching, interpreting, and creating art in the twenty-first century. ARTS 1313 emphasizes the 2-dimensional arts. Its companion courses, ARTS 1314 and ARTS 1315, support this studio course with lectures, readings, visiting artists, and demonstrations. Co-requisites: ARTS 1314 and ARTS 1315.

ARTS 1314. W.A.S.H. - 3D. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to studio arts, art history, theory, and technology. The course is designed to immerse students in an intense program of researching, interpreting, and creating art in the twenty-first century. ARTS 1314 emphasizes the 3-dimensional arts. Its companion courses, ARTS 1315 and ARTS 1313, support this studio course with lectures, readings, visiting artists, and demonstrations. Co-requisites: ARTS 1315 and ARTS 1313.

ARTS 1315. W.A.S.H. - Lecture. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to the concepts, theories, and information for development in ARTS 1313 and ARTS 1314, the studio components linked with this visual arts foundation course. The course provides an arena for students to experience lectures, demonstrations, seminar activities, and visiting speakers as well as the more traditional aspects of the discipline. The course is geared towards contemporary visual concerns and uses experimental techniques to expose students to an array of styles and methodologies. Co-requisites: ARTS 1313 and ARTS 1314.

ARTS 1316. Drawing. 3 Hours.

Students engage in an in-depth study of the fundamental principles of drawing and mark making. Students draw from observation and develop the ability to create 2-dimensional representations using Line, Value, Shape, Edge, Plane and Volume, Space, Texture, Perspective, and Gesture. The use of negative space and compositional strategies are emphasized. Traditions of drawing are examined, and drawing is placed in a historical context that emphasizes its importance in contemporary art.

ARTS 2313. Foundations In Digital Art. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to the use of the computer as an art-making medium. Students are introduced to digital software and techniques, image creation and manipulation, digital design, compositional methods, and the use of digital tools as a vehicle of creative problem-solving and personal creative expression.

ARTS 2317. Life Drawing I. 3 Hours.

Students engage in drawing from the model in various media. Gesture drawing and figure structure are studied. Line, Value, and Shape, Plane, and Volume are used as elements to depict the figure in space with accurate proportions. The study leads toward a final portfolio that demonstrates proficiency representing the figure in cohesive and complete compositions.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315 and ARTS 1316 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 2323. Principles Of Graphic Design. 3 Hours.

The first in the graphic design program of study, this course emphasizes creative thinking, problem solving, and the development of the design process. Each project builds upon the previous one in depth and complexity as students explore a range of visual communication challenges.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313,ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2313.

ARTS 2343. Animation Concepts And Technqs. 3 Hours.

Students study the principles and techniques of traditional animation, including the principles of motion, storyboarding, flipbooks, cel, and pencil animation. In addition, students are introduced to the use of computers in animation.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, and ARTS 2313 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 2344. 2D Computer Animation. 3 Hours.

Students use computer software to create 2D animations that incorporate traditional techniques and styles, such as drawing and painting, cut paper, cel animation, and stop action. Story development is emphasized, and video editing techniques are practiced.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2343 and ARTS 3317 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 2365. Photographic Visualization. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to advanced exposure techniques and the principles necessary to master use of film and the photographic darkroom.

ARTS 2370. Digital Photography I. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to the tools and techniques used in the scanning, creation, manipulation, and presentation of digital images.

ARTS 2375. Photographic Concepts. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to basic camera functions and concepts, use of visual design elements, and articulation of personal ideas through the medium of fine art photography.

ARTS 3305. Painting I. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to the materials, techniques, and concepts of oil painting. Emphasis is placed on painting from observation, the depiction light and shadow, and basic color theory. Process based painting and concept based abstraction are explored. Students learn to recognize and use the tools and materials and nomenclature related to oil painting including supports and grounds, mediums, binders, and brushes. The role of painting in art history and in contemporary art will be examined.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316.

ARTS 3307. Performance and Video Art. 3 Hours.

Students explore performance and video art both in practice and theory, including live performance, performance and video, live presence/virtual spaces, performance for the camera, site specific performance, and collaborative performance.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, and ARTS 1315.

ARTS 3310. Printmaking. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to the techniques and procedures of printmaking with an emphasis placed on relief, monoprint, and intaglio methods.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316 and ARTS 2313.

ARTS 3315. Collage. 3 Hours.

A class in which students follow the precepts of the twentieth century art form of using and exploring the juxtaposition and layering of a variety of materials and images. The dynamics of composition and a further investigation of the use of color and inherent capabilities of contrasting images and textures are studied. Students use a variety of materials including the found object, discarded papers, invented textures, and painted surfaces to create their imagery.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, ARTS 2313 and ARTS 3318.

ARTS 3317. Life Drawing II. 3 Hours.

Students explore the use of the figure as subject matter in art. Observational skills are practiced and refined, and personal expression is emphasized. A variety of media are explored. The use of the figure in contemporary art is studied.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, and ARTS 1317 or 2317.

ARTS 3318. Sculpture I. 3 Hours.

Students explore a variety of processes and materials as ways of learning the vocabulary of three-dimensional art. Students incorporate wood, metal, and found objects into art as ways of expanding their visual vocabulary. Group critiques help the student learn contemporary approaches to art making in order to improve their sculptural skills and to develop personal artistic vision.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315.

ARTS 3320. Ceramics I. 3 Hours.

Students are provided an introduction to clay, the potential it has as a material, and an overview of the basic principles involved in the forming/processing of it. The basic forming techniques explore all aspects of hand building (pinch, coil and slab construction) as well as an introduction to the wheel. Basic firing techniques and finishes will be discussed. The emphasis of the course is rooted in sculpture.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315 and ARTS 1316.

ARTS 3322. Typography. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the principles, processes, and terminology of typography, this course is intended to develop the student?s sensibility in the use of letter, word, text, typographic hierarchy, and organizational systems.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, ARTS 2313, and ARTS 2323.

ARTS 3323. Graphic Design In Context. 3 Hours.

In consideration of audience, medium, and message, students focus on design practice as applied to contemporary issues. Students pursue a range of projects that require deep exploration of concept as well as individual expression of voice and creativity.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2323, ARTS 3322.

ARTS 3324. Corporate Identity Design. 3 Hours.

Students focus on the integrated design of identity systems, marketing materials, and branding applications in order to establish and promote corporate identities. Students develop research-based, comprehensive branding strategies and identity designs for interrelated applications.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 3323.

ARTS 3326. Graphic Design Production. 3 Hours.

Students focuses on graphic design production techniques and the application of contemporary tools and processes employed by visual designers. This course emphasizes the mastery of a digital workflow, concluding with the physical output.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, ARTS 2313, ARTS 3322, ARTS 3323 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 3330. Methods in Art Education. 3 Hours.

This class is designed to give the art education major the tools necessary to be successful in the classroom. The primary focus is the development of a teaching philosophy and curricula relevant to the all level teaching certification. Topics covered may include developing a teaching philosophy, preparing and presenting lesson plans, techniques in various art mediums that are applicable to the classroom, and strategies for assessments and critiques. Class discussions and readings on current art education topics are also required.
Prerequisite: ARTS 3385, CISE 3384.

ARTS 3335. Packaging Design. 3 Hours.

Students examine graphic communication and techniques for packaging, structural, and three-dimensional design challenges. Experimentation with a diverse range of material and form, imagery, typography, and color are explored for a targeted audience based on comprehensive research, including the design brief. In addition, packaging sustainability is addressed.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 3322 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 3343. Intro To 3D Computer Animation. 3 Hours.

Students study the basics of 3D Animation including 3D modeling techniques, key-framing and graph editing, shading, lighting, and rendering.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, and ARTS 2313.

ARTS 3344. Advanced 3D Computer Animation. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students who are experienced with basic 3D animation concepts and technical practice. The course introduces more sophisticated concepts and techniques and emphasizes animation development through hands-on practice. The course will focus on animation concepts, creative animation design, and expanding students knowledge of topics, tools, and techniques.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2343, and ARTS 3343 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 3353. Motion Graphics. 3 Hours.

Students study the use of design elements including type, logos, and images to create motion graphics for digital video and interactive applications. Students are introduced to video capture and editing in addition to motion graphics tools and programming languages.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2313 and ARTS 2343 or ARTS 3317 (concurrent enrollment allowed) with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 3354. Experimental Animation. 3 Hours.

Students explore alternative techniques in the creation of animation to include cutout animation, pixilation, lo-fi animation as well as other emerging processes. Coursework focuses on experimental approaches to story and content generation. Readings and discussions are focused on technical, aesthetic, and theoretical issues relating to these disciplines.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1317, ARTS 2313 and ARTS 2343 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 3355. Animation Pre-Production. 3 Hours.

Students create scripts, storyboards for animation, 2D and 3D animatics, and color schemes for animation and character designs. Proper cinematography techniques are emphasized.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, ARTS 2313, ARTS 2343, and ARTS 3343.

ARTS 3356. Visual Effects and Animation. 3 Hours.

Students explore visual effects for animation and digital film making. Students concentrate on the creative pipeline for the development of visual effects and the procedures for planning, creating, and applying such effects. Specific topics may include masking, particle systems, motion tracking, chroma key, and other related techniques. Students explore the use of visual effects for narrative and experimental contexts. Readings and discussions focus on technical, aesthetic, and theoretical issues relating to this discipline.
Prerequisite: ARTS 2343.

ARTS 3360. The Photographic Digital Print. 3 Hours.

Students are provided an investigation of traditional and alternative photographic printing and mixed media processes. Students complete a portfolio of original photographic work demonstrating personal creative and conceptual development.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, ARTS 2375.

ARTS 3362. Environmental Portraiture. 3 Hours.

Blending portraiture and context, the environmental portrait illuminates the character and personality of its subject. Learning to photograph people in their natural surroundings thus capturing insight into their lives is the goal of this course. Students complete a portfolio of original photographic work focusing on the topic of environmental portraiture.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, ARTS 2375.

ARTS 3364. Photography Seminar. 3 Hours.

Students study a different topic presented each semester. May be repeated for credit. A different topic is presented each semester. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, ARTS 2375.

ARTS 3365. Film Appreciation. 3 Hours.

ARTS 3368. Studio Practices I. 3 Hours.

Students learn the fundamentals of working with light both in the studio and on location. They are introduced to the use and control of existing light as well as high-powered electronic flash in the realm of digital photography.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, 1314, 1315, 2365, 2370, and 2375 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 3370. Digital Photography II. 3 Hours.

Students are engaged in an advanced study of the tools, techniques, and applications of digital photography in the desktop computing environment. Emphasis is placed on non-destructive manipulation of images and digital workflow techniques.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370 and ARTS 2375 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 3373. Digital Imaging. 3 Hours.

Students explore advanced computer imaging techniques in support of individual student interests. Advanced capture, manipulation, and printing procedures are explored and applied in developing digital portfolios. Credit 3 or 6.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2370.

ARTS 3374. Alternative Photo Processes. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to a variety of non-standard photographic processes.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, ARTS 2375 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 3375. Web Site Development. 3 Hours.

Students are introduced to the process of designing and creating web sites for the World Wide Web. Beginning with an understanding of the Internet and HTML, the basic language of the web, students move on to work with authoring tools used in building and maintaining websites. The course concludes with a discussion of challenges facing web designers and the future of this powerful communication tool.
Prerequisite: ARTS 2370.

ARTS 3382. The History Of Animation. 3 Hours.

Students engage in a survey of the History of Animation from early cartoons through contemporary special effects and 3D characters. The political, artistic, and social uses of animation are examined.
Prerequisite: ARTS 2386 OR ARTS 3385 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 3383. Design History. 3 Hours.

Students are provided an in-depth study of styles, schools, philosophies, and parallel fields of design from the Industrial Revolution to the present. Emphasis is placed on the development of the profession of graphic design and its relationship to commerce and technology.
Prerequisite: ARTS 2386 or ARTS 3385.

ARTS 3385. Art History Survey II. 3 Hours.

Students are provided a chronological survey of major artworks, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present.

ARTS 3386. Ancient Greek and Roman Art. 3 Hours.

Students examine the art and architecture of the ancient Greek and Roman empires. Studies will also include earlier civilizations such as the Minoans and Myceneans through the dissolution of the Roman Empire and the early medieval period. Students consider various art forms such as ancient coins, bronze and marble sculpture, Roman wall painting, and religious and civic architecture.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1303, ARTS 3385.

ARTS 3387. Renaissance Art History. 3 Hours.

Students engage in a survey the art and architecture of the Renaissance. Credit: 3. .
Prerequisite: ARTS 3386.

ARTS 4019. Special Topic. 1-6 Hours.

Students study problems selected within an area of specialization. Variable Credit (1-3). (This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog.)
Prerequisite: 6 hours of credit in the area of investigation, with permission of the instructor and department chair.

ARTS 4079. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

This course is provided to allow the student, under the supervision of a faculty member, to develop specialized skills and to conduct an investigation into an area of special interest. Regular meetings are held with the faculty sponsor. The course culminates in a portfolio of work and/or a scholarly written report. Departmental approval is required before the student may enroll in this course. May be repeated or taken concurrently to a maximum of 6 hours. (This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog.) Variable credit (1-3).
Prerequisite: ARTS 2375 and ARTS 2370.

ARTS 4305. Advanced Painting. 3 Hours.

Students explore traditional painting processes and concepts along with the introduction of non-traditional techniques and materials. Emphasis is placed on skill development and individual exploration of ideas.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 3305.

ARTS 4307. Painting In Aquamedia. 3 Hours.

Students focus on transparent watercolor. Landscape, still life, and the figure are emphasized, along with experimentation.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 3305 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4309. Book Arts. 3 Hours.

Students explore techniques and processes used to create books as an artistic expression. Techniques such as papermaking and bookbinding are used along with printmaking, photography, and drawing. Students use traditional and experimental book structures to create books that are personal expressions. Each student creates a series of books. The historical and conceptual foundations of contemporary artists' bookmaking are also examined.
Prerequisite: ARTS 3310.

ARTS 4310. Advanced Printmaking. 3 Hours.

Students study advanced problems in printmaking as well as special procedures and problems involving further investigation of various printmaking media and formats. An emphasis is placed on creative development.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, 1314, 1315, and 3310 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4311. Advanced Studio. 3 Hours.

This course is an interdisciplinary studio course emphasizing contemporary issues in art. Students are encouraged to work in a variety of mediums, cross boundaries between mediums, incorporate technology, and collaborate. They develop a body of work that is based on concepts relevant to personal expression and contemporary issues. Group and individual critiques are used to evaluate progress and students are encouraged to exhibit their work. Credit 3
Prerequisite: 9 hours of advanced Art Studio or Photography courses with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4313. W.A.S.H Practicum. 3 Hours.

Students will gain leadership and advanced critque skills while mentoring other students, contributing and particpating in the Workshop in Art Studio and History (W.A.S.H) program. Additionally, students will be expected to complete an independent studio project. Departmental approval is required.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, Senior standing.

ARTS 4315. Professional Practices in Art. 3 Hours.

Students prepare professional portfolios and proposals for exhibitions, grants, residencies, and other opportunities. Students learn to photograph their artwork and to write a resume, artist statement, and cover letter. They present exhibitions and talks to the public in professional settings. Class discussions, guest lectures, and readings on current art topics are also required.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, and ARTS 1315 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4316. Advanced Drawing. 3 Hours.

Students study drawing problems with emphasis on the development of personal expressive techniques.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 3317.

ARTS 4317. Museum And Gallery Practices. 3 Hours.

Students focus on the practices and operations of Alternative Art Spaces, Commercial Art Galleries, and Museums of Art. Students visit museums and galleries in the area and assist with exhibitions in university art galleries. The course covers art handling and installation, registration procedures, and curatorial theories and practices. Students curate and mount exhibits and prepare press materials and publicity as course projects.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 2386 or ARTS 3385 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4318. Sculpture II. 3 Hours.

Students explore three-dimensional media through the proper use of tools, working processes, and a variety of materials. Emphasis placed on skill development and individual exploration of ideas.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 3318.

ARTS 4320. Ceramics II. 3 Hours.

Students engage in a continued exploration of clay with an emphasis on personal expression and discovery. The course is geared towards those students dedicated to understanding the contemporary issues surrounding the material in relationship to their own work and methodology. There are a number of required readings/writings, along with several group discussions. Additional technical information is provided regarding advanced techniques (mold-making, firing wood/gas/soda kilns, and alternative building techniques). Interdisciplinary work is encouraged.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 3320 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4323. Senior Studio In Graphic Desgn. 3 Hours.

An internship in an approved field and an intense portfolio review.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2323, ARTS 3322, ARTS 3323, and ARTS 3324 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4325. Advanced Typographic Design. 3 Hours.

Students explore typography beyond its foundations. Students investigate the interdependence of type, image, and content, as they relate to visual communication. Experimental and hand-created type are explored with the goal of developing a sophisticated typographic voice.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 3323 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4331. Illustration. 3 Hours.

Students take an explorative and conceptual approach to contemporary illustration including both traditional and digital media. Students consider a range of design possibilities including visual metaphor as an illustrative solution.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2313, ARTS 2323, and ARTS 3322 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4333. Interactive Design. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced course for web design concepts and processes as well as motion graphics applying Dreamweaver, Flash, Photoshop, and ImageReady applications. Students address terminology of the web environment, usability, web file formats, JavaScript, web typography, and web graphics. In addition, students are introduced to web-based interactive multimedia including animation, sound, and motion graphics.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2313, ARTS 3322, ARTS 3323, and ARTS 3375 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4343. Advanced Interactive Design. 3 Hours.

Students address usability, web file formats, multiple-platform design, advanced web typography, and the terminology of the interactive design environment. It builds on theories and techniques introduced in ARTS 4333, including web design concepts, processes, and the application of programming languages to produce Responsive Website Design (RWD).
Prerequisite: ARTS 3322 and ARTS 4333.

ARTS 4350. Character Animation. 3 Hours.

Students explore the techniques of character animation and rigging, using pre-rigged characters and models in 3D computer software.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, ARTS 2313, ARTS 2343, and ARTS 3343 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4355. Shading, Lighting & Rendering. 3 Hours.

Students engage in an in depth study of surfaces and shaders including texture and image mapping, lighting for compositing, cel shading, and rendering methods.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, ARTS 2313, ARTS 2343, and ARTS 3343 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4356. 2D Interactive Animation. 3 Hours.

Students engage in an in-depth study of 2D Interactive Multimedia Technologies for the creation and distribution of content over the internet and as stand-alone desktop applications. Coursework is concentrate on the development of interactive audio and video, interactive narratives, and game production. Focus is on both asset creation and scripting for these types of applications. Readings and discussions focus on technical, aesthetic, and theoretical issues relating to this evolving art medium.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, 1314, 1315, 1316, 2313, 2343, and 3343.

ARTS 4357. 3D Interactive Animation. 3 Hours.

Student engage in an in-depth study of 3D Interactive Multimedia Technologies for the creation and distribution of content over the internet and as stand-alone desktop applications. Coursework is concentrate on the development of 3D models, environments, and animations for interactive narratives and game production. Additional topics may include the study of surfaces and shaders for 3D interactive media including texture and image mapping, lighting, shading, and rendering methods.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, ARTS 2313, ARTS 2343, and ARTS 3343 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4358. Animation Portfolio. 3 Hours.

Students create a work in a specific area of expertise and author a demo reel using this work and refined work from previous courses. A print portfolio is created and job searching skills such as presentation and resume building are taught.
Prerequisite: 12 hours of animation courses with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4368. Studio Practices II. 3 Hours.

This course is a continuation of ARTS 3368. Students learn advanced studio lighting techniques while completing a body of creative photographic work. Credit. 3.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, ARTS 2375 and ARTS 3368 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4370. Documentary Photography. 3 Hours.


Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4371. Human Form: A Photographc Stdy. 3 Hours.

Students take an investigative look into the use of the human form through the medium of photography. Students discuss a variety of contexts and representations of the human body throughout the history of art. Students complete a body of photographic work using or referencing the human figure.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, ARTS 2375 .

ARTS 4372. Photographic Narratives. 3 Hours.

Students are provided a broad and intensive investigation of visual narratives through photographic representation. Photographic books, journals, installations, slide shows, and mixed media collage are explored as a means of developing visual fluency and personal expression. The implications of photographic sequencing and contextual significance are also an emphasis of this course.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4373. Contemporary Issues in Pho. 3 Hours.

Students are provided an understanding of contemporary photographic trends. The work of photographers who are currently having an impact on fine art photography are discussed along with critical analysis of art theory. Students are expected to complete a body of photographic work that demonstrates personal conceptual development.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4381. History of Photography. 3 Hours.

Students study the history of photography from its earliest beginnings. Technical, visual, aesthetic, and social aspects are considered.
Prerequisite: ARTS 2386 or ARTS 3385 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4384. Modern Art Before 1945. 3 Hours.

Students examine modern art in Europe and the United States through a critical engagement with ideas of modernism and methodologies from 1850 through World War II. Mediums to be studied may include photography, painting, drawing, sculpture, and early film. Credit 3
Prerequisite: ARTS 2386 or ARTS 3385 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4385. Art Since 1945. 3 Hours.

Student engage in an international examination of painting, sculpture, and other media since 1945. Students explore artistic production through social, political, historical, and theoretical frameworks.
Prerequisite: ARTS 2386 or ARTS 3385 with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4387. History Of Mexican Art. 3 Hours.

Student engage in a survey of Mexican and Mesoamerican art. Students study images of prehistoric artifacts and the art and architecture of pre-Hispanic cultures, including the Olmec, Mixtec, Maya, and Aztec. The impact of the Spanish conquest, the role of art in the Mexican Revolution and the Socialist movement, Arte Popular, the Muralists, the late twentieth century, and contemporary Mexican art are also explored.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1303 and (ARTS 2386 or ARTS 3385) with a grade of C or better.

ARTS 4389. Criticism Thry In Visual Arts. 3 Hours.

Students study historical and contemporary aspects of major thinking concerning the visual arts.
Prerequisite: ARTS 1303 and (ARTS 2386 or ARTS 3385) and (ARTS 4385 or ARTS 4388) with a grade of C or better.

Faculty 

Director/Chair: Michael Henderson

Martin F. Amorous, MFA, Associate Professor, Department of Art, MFA, Univ of Arizona; MA, Univ of New Mexico; BFA, Univ of New Mexico

Mary K Borcherding, MFA, Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Indiana University-Bloomington; BS, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison

Jonathan Ronald Bryson, MFA, Assistant Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Ball State University; BFA, Clemson University

Charlotte M. Drumm, MFA, Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Florida State University; BA, Louisiana College

Rebecca L Finley, MFA, Professor of Photography, Department of Art, MFA, San Francisco Art Inst; BA, Univ of Tennessee-Knoxville

Melissa Catharine Glasscock, MFA, Assistant Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Savannah College Art & Design; BFA, Univ of Central Florida

Valerie Jean Hanks, MFA, Assistant Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Washington State University; MA, Stephen F Austin University; BFA, Stephen F Austin University

Michael Henderson, MFA, Professor and Chair of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Univ of North Texas; BFA, Univ of North Texas

Barbara Alicja Kaminska, PHD, Assistant Professor of Art, Department of Art, PHD, Univ of Calif-Santa Barbara; MA, University of Warsaw

Emily Taehee Kim, MFA, Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, LSU & A&M College; BFA, Hanyang University

Patric Kevin Lawler, MFA, Associate Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, University of Iowa; MA, University of Iowa; BFA, University of Iowa

Melissa L Mednicov, PHD, Associate Professor of Art, Department of Art, PHD, Penn State Un-Univ Park; MA, Penn State Un-Univ Park; BA, Smith College

Edward Michael Morin, MFA, Associate Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Syracuse University; BFA, Univ of North Texas

Emily Ann Peacock, MFA, Assistant Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Univ of Houston-Main; BS, Sam Houston State University

Ernan Cesar Rivera, MFA, Assistant Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Texas State Univ-San Marcos; BFA, Texas State Univ-San Marcos

Tony R. Shipp, MFA, Associate Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Univ of Florida; BA, Montana State Univ-Billings

Jessica Annie Simorte, MFA, Assistant Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Univ of Cincinnati; BA, University of Saint Mary

Walton A Watkins, MFA, Associate Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Univ of Tennessee-Knoxville; MA, Northwestern St Un of Louisana; BA, Northwestern St Un of Louisana

Interim Faculty

Joshua Robert Backus, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Univ of Chicago; BFA, School of Art Inst of Chicago

Christopher Frank Cascio, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Univ of Houston-Main; BFA, San Francisco Art Inst

Lauren Clay, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Wichita State University; BA, McNeese State University

Meghan Catherine Cook, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Texas A&M University; BFA, Savannah College Art & Design

The Estate of Mike Galbreth, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Univ of Houston-Main; BFA, The University of Memphis

Shaun T Griffiths, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Alfred University; MA, University of Sunderland; BFA, San Jose State University

Emily Margaret Gayle Howard, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi; BFA, Sam Houston State University

Stephenie Ane Koerne, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Academy of Art University; BA, St Edwards University

Russell Wayne Marcontell, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Uni de Guanajuato Inst Allende; BFA, Sam Houston State University

Tudor Mitroi, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Univ of North Texas; DIPL, Institute of Plastic Art

Meredith Massar Munson, PHD, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art, Department of Art, PHD, Graduate Theological Union; MA, Texas Christian University; BA, Baylor University

Divya Murthy, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Tufts University; BFA, Univ of Houston-Main

Laura Vanessa Napier, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Bard College; BFA, Cooper Union for Adv Sci & Art

Patricia Kay Ramsay, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Syracuse University; BFA, The University of the Arts

Cynthia K Reid, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Sam Houston State University; MED, Sam Houston State University; BAT, Sam Houston State University

Brittney Eileen Thomas, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Univ of Houston-Main; BFA, Lamar University

Edith Carol Wells, MFA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Goddard College; MA, Southwest Baptist Theo Seminar; BS, Auburn University

Willie Royce Williams, MFA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MFA, Univ of Southern California; BFA, Texas A&M-Kingsville

Martha E Willis, MA, Lecturer of Art, Department of Art, MA, Univ of Houston-Clear Lake; BA, Univ of Houston-Clear Lake