Political Science (POLS)

POLS 5078. Problems/Internships- Pol Sci. 1-3 Hours.

This course is designed for topics in which the subject cuts across two or more areas of concentration. The course may be taken on an individual basis with the permission of the Political Science Department Chair. The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research and/or professional practice. May be repeated when topic varies. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Variable Credit (1 to 3).

POLS 5319. Women in Politics. 3 Hours.

Students examine the role of women in politics, including the origins and implications of gender differences, women as political participants, women as political candidates, and women as political office holders.
Prerequisite: Admission to the MA in Political Science program or departmental approval.

POLS 5330. American Politics. 3 Hours.

Students examine the major debates and scholarship in the field of American politics. The course focuses on political institutions and political behavior with topics that may include Congress, the Presidency, the Judiciary, political ideology, attitudes and beliefs, public opinion, voting behavior, political parties, interest groups, and mass movements. Students study the classics in the American politics literature as well as current research. Students engage in research and writing.

POLS 5334. Judicial Politics. 3 Hours.

Students examine the American judicial system and American judicial politics. They study the function and operation of the judiciary, including the role and operation of the U.S. Supreme Court, the origins and function of judicial power, and methods of judicial selection.
Prerequisite: Admission to the MA in Political Science program or departmental approval.

POLS 5336. The U.S. Presidency. 3 Hours.

Students examine the structure, powers, and place of the presidency in the American constitutional order. Students study changes in presidential power from the founding to the contemporary era.
Prerequisite: Admission to the MA in Political Science program or departmental approval.

POLS 5337. The U.S. Congress. 3 Hours.

Students explore the structure, powers, organization, procedures, and operations of the U.S. Congress. Topics may include the selection of legislators; legislative leadership; the influence of lobbyists, political parties, legislative committees, and executives; legislative roles and norms; congressional elections; representation; and policymaking.
Prerequisite: Admission to the MA in Political Science program or departmental approval.

POLS 5339. American Political Parties. 3 Hours.

Students examine political parties in American politics. Topics may include party formation, ideologies, and party functions in government, elections, and organization.
Prerequisite: Admission to the MA in Political Science program or departmental approval.

POLS 5340. Political Attitudes & Behavior. 3 Hours.

Students examine individuals' attitudes and behaviors regarding politics. They analyze the determinants, formation, and expression of ideology and partisanship. Students also explore individuals' political participation, particularly voting behavior. The course is research oriented, with an emphasis on pursuing new directions in research.
Prerequisite: Admission to the MA in Political Science program or departmental approval.

POLS 5360. Seminar in American Politics. 3 Hours.

Students examine the relevant literature pertaining to a specific topic or debate within the field of American politics. Students may repeat this for credit when the topic differs.

POLS 5362. Seminar in Political Theory. 3 Hours.

Students examine the relevant literature pertaining to a specific topic or debate within the field of political theory. Students may repeat this for credit when the topic differs.

POLS 5364. Media & Politics. 3 Hours.

Students examine the role and impact of the media on U.S. politics. Students study the impact of the media on campaigns and election outcomes, the media as a source of political information, the agenda setting power of the media, the role of the "free press" in a democracy, and citizens' relationship to the media.
Prerequisite: Admission to the MA in Political Science program or departmental approval.

POLS 5367. Smnr in Internationl Relations. 3 Hours.

Students examine the relevant literature pertaining to a specific topic or debate within the field of international relations. Students may repeat this for credit when the topic differs.

POLS 5371. Comparative Politics. 3 Hours.

Students examine the major theories, concepts, and methods of comparative analysis. Topics include the major concepts of comparative politics which may include: political elites, institutions, public policy, development and modernization, elections and political behavior, mass movements, and revolution and political violence.

POLS 5372. Seminar in Comparative Politic. 3 Hours.

Students examine the relevant literature pertaining to a specific topic or debate within the field of international relations. Topics may include political development, sustainability, comparative institutions, comparative public policy, transitions to democracy, and opinions and behavior. The seminar may also focus on one or more regions or individual countries. .Students may repeat this for credit when the topic differs.

POLS 5373. International Relations. 3 Hours.

Students examine the major theories, concepts, and methods of international relations. Specific topics may include conflict and cooperation; the relationship between domestic and international politics; and transnational issues and actors.

POLS 5377. Scope & Mth of Political Sci. 3 Hours.

Students examine the quantitative and qualitative research methods used in modern political science.

POLS 5379. Workshop:Teachng Political Sci. 3 Hours.

Students examine a variety of topics useful to teaching political science or government courses. Topics may include Texas politics, constitutional issues, current elections, and using technology in the class classroom. Students may repeat the course when topic varies.

POLS 5382. Smnr in Public Administration. 3 Hours.

Students examine the relevant literature pertaining to a specific topic or debate within the field of public administration. Students may repeat this for credit when the topic differs.

POLS 5385. Public Policy. 3 Hours.

Students examine the process of public policy formulation, governmental planning, and administrative decision-making, giving special attention to the public administrator as a policy-maker and as one responsible for policy implementation.

POLS 5395. Intrnshp & Wrk Exp-Public Serv. 3 Hours.

Students complete a 6 hour, 12 month internship. The internship is required for the MPA degree and fulfils a requirement by its accrediting agency NASPAA, the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. Enrollment is by permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.

POLS 6098. Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

Students will make use of appropriate literature and research techniques in the development of the thesis. Variable Credit (1-3).

POLS 6099. Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

Students will make use of appropriate literature and research techniques in the development of the thesis. Variable Credit (1-3).

POLS 7330. Public Policy & School Distrct. 3 Hours.

Students examines school districts as systems of governance in American communities and the problems associated with governance, with particular emphasis upon educational issues. Topics may include democratic theory, local political systems, intergovernmental relations, relationships with citizens, and political accountability.