English (ENGL)

ENGL 5301. Grad Rsrch: Methods & Theories. 3 Hours.

Students learn graduate-level research methods in literature and the study of the book. Required of all English majors under MA Plan I, MA Plan II, and MEd Plan II.

ENGL 5302. Literary Theory. 3 Hours.

Students study various theories and theorists of literary interpretation with application and practice in writing criticism.

ENGL 5303. Hist Dvlpt Of English Language. 3 Hours.

Students study cultural, historical, and philological concepts in the development of the English language from its Indo-European prototype through Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-French, and Early Modern English to its present form.

ENGL 5304. English Linguistics. 3 Hours.

Students study sociolinguistics, dialectology, lexicography, stylistics through linguistic analysis, principles of semantics, and linguistics in relation to the teaching of English.

ENGL 5306. American Lit: Pre-Civil War. 3 Hours.

Students examine selected works and movements in American literature from the colonial period to the Civil War. Students explore critical issues such as the histories of discovery and conquest, nations and empire, race and slavery, and gender and sexuality.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 5307. American Lit: Post-Civil War. 3 Hours.

Students explore how regional and national American literature after the Civil War attempts to define an American identity and the American experience. Coursework might involve literary exploration of the opening of the American West, the development of African-American literature, and the rise of the great American novel.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 5308. US Ethnic Literatures. 3 Hours.

Students examine the literary production of various ethnic groups in the United States, and analyze literature of marginalized populations, migrants, and diasporas. Analysis includes critical discussion of political forces that have shaped ethnic literatures.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 5309. British Lit: Pre-Industrial. 3 Hours.

Students analyze literature produced in pre-industrialized Britain and explore the evolution of the English language and literature in its early phases. Topics might include the Icelandic epics, the early and middle English genres, or the impact of the Norman Invasion on Saxon.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 5310. British Lit: Post-Industrial. 3 Hours.

Students explore major developments in the literature of post-industrial Britain by analyzing the aesthetic trends that led to literary movements. Topics might include Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, Post-Modernism, or students might explore the history of particular genres, such as the rise of the novel, lyrical poetry, autobiography, or news reporting.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 5311. Anglophone Literature. 3 Hours.

Students examine world, multicultural, and post-colonial literature, analyzing how global history and politics both shape and are reflected in literary traditions that, in turn, have influenced the history of literature written in English. Students appraise the impact of non-English literatures on writers in the Anglophone tradition to gain an appreciation for the global history and scope of literary traditions.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 5312. Directed Study. 3 Hours.

Students engage in a specialized topic in literature or language under the direct supervision of a faculty member and with written consent of the Department Chair. A student may take no more than six credit hours of directed study during his or her graduate career.

ENGL 5313. Studies in Technical Comm.. 3 Hours.

Students undertake an in-depth study of technical and professional communication. Students examine the field and conduct primary research.
Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Study.

ENGL 5331. Creative Writing: Fiction. 3 Hours.

Students actively participate in a workshop that emphasizes the writing and revision of fiction and creative nonfiction.

ENGL 5332. Creative Writing: Poetry. 3 Hours.

Students actively participate in a workshop that emphasizes the writing and revision of poetry.

ENGL 5333. Practicum:Editing & Publishing. 3 Hours.

Students study and apply current scholarship in editing and publishing. They have the opportunity to work both on and off campus as writers and editors in various professions.

ENGL 5334. Creative Writing: Nonfiction. 3 Hours.

Students study the art and craft of creative nonfiction across a range of its broadly-defined forms with the purpose of writing original and publishable texts.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 5335. Workshop In Teaching Writing. 3 Hours.

Students participate in a workshop format designed for teaching writing in the secondary schools. Topics emphasize applications of current writing theory and research.

ENGL 5336. Narrative Theory. 3 Hours.

Students study primary texts in narrative theory, in addition to the secondary texts that analyze concepts and research in the field. Students spend considerable attention to ideological contributions to narrative theory, past and present.

ENGL 5337. Poetic Theory and Prosody. 3 Hours.

Students study primary texts and readings along with secondary texts that provide analyses of the concepts and research in poetic theory and English prosody. Students spend considerable attention to ideological contributions to poetic theory from a historical perspective.

ENGL 5338. Creative Writing Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

Students examine the pedagogical theories of, and provides practical training in, the teaching of creative writing, both inside and outside of academia.
Prerequisite: Approval from Program Director.

ENGL 5340. The Writer's Life. 3 Hours.

Students examine the writer's life within and beyond the program, both inside and outside of academia. The course will function both as an introduction to graduate-level work in creative writing, editing, and publishing, and as an introduction to the various ways in which writers establish professional lives after the degree.
Prerequisite: Admission to the MFA in Creative Writing, Editing, and Publishing or Approval from Program Director.

ENGL 5367. Practicm in Teaching Coll Comp. 3 Hours.

Students study modern rhetorical principles and methodologies used in teaching college-level writing.

ENGL 5374. Women's Literature. 3 Hours.

Students apply current theory and research to an analysis of selected women writers from various historical ages, genres, and nationalities. Emphases may vary each semester.

ENGL 5384. Rhetoric & Composition Theory. 3 Hours.

Students study selected topics in historical and contemporary rhetoric, rhetorical criticism, and composition theory. Students will apply current theory and research in rhetoric and composition to primary research.

ENGL 6096. MFA Thesis I. 1-3 Hours.

In the first semester of MFA graduate thesis, the student works under close faculty supervision to produce a thesis prospectus approved by all members of the reading committee and submits a plan for completion. Variable Credit (1 to 3).
Prerequisite: Approval of Program Director.

ENGL 6097. MFA Thesis II. 1-3 Hours.

In the second semester of MFA graduate thesis, the student works under close faculty supervision to complete the thesis. The student must enroll in this class from term to term until the thesis is completed. Variable Credit (1 to 3).
Prerequisite: ENGL 6096.

ENGL 6098. MA Thesis I. 1-3 Hours.

In this first semester of graduate thesis, the student works under close faculty supervision to produce a thesis prospectus approved by all members of the reading committee and submits a draft of the introduction. Variable Credit (1-3).

ENGL 6099. MA Thesis II. 1-3 Hours.

In this second semester of graduate thesis, the student works under close faculty supervision to complete the thesis. The student must enroll in this class from term to term until the thesis is completed. Variable Credit (1-3).

ENGL 6301. Literary Theory Seminar. 3 Hours.

Students thoroughly examine a theory or major theorist in literary studies following contemporary scholarship methods. Students might explore psychoanalysis, ecocriticism, deconstruction, rhetorical analysis, or another major theoretical methodology.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 6302. Seminar in Major Author. 3 Hours.

Students engage in a sustained study and analysis of the career and canon of a major author who has made substantial contributions to the development of American, British, and/or Anglophone Literature. Students synthesize biographical and historical data with an author's literary works in order to fully evaluate the author's major status.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 6303. English Linguistics Seminar. 3 Hours.

Students explore advanced questions about the structure and evolution of the English language. Topics might include phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, or pragmatics, or explore issues in socio-linguistics present in all works of literature.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 6304. Literary Movements Seminar. 3 Hours.

Students explore the collaborative nature and sociability of authors within international literary movements or traditions, such as Naturalism, Transcendentalism, or Surrealism. Students work with primary texts within the chosen movement and explore how the authors? interactions affect literary production.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 6305. Literary Genre Seminar. 3 Hours.

Students explore the aims, history, and form of a literary genre, such as the novel, the pastoral ode, or the essay. Students deepen their understanding of generic classifications, the relationship between genres, and how generic conventions persistently shape our perceptions of the world.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 6306. Global Ethnic Literatures. 3 Hours.

Students explore the literary production of various underrepresented ethnic groups in the world that influence the history of literature in English. Topics might include political hegemony, immigration and diasporas, national and cultural identity, and the literary marketplace.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 6330. Special Topics in English. 3 Hours.

(Prior SH course id: ENG 630); Students apply current research to an analysis and understanding of a special topic in English language, literature, theory, and/or a writing discipline. The contents and approaches to the materials vary from term to term.