Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology

About

Be a part of a top ranked Criminal Justice and Criminology program! Our on-line graduate degree programs were ranked #1 in the United States in early 2017 by U.S. News and World Report. Graduate programs in our department educate students with a variety of interests. Degrees target student interests from advancing criminal justice knowledge and practice through research to career development within the criminal justice system. The department also has specialized graduate degree programs for criminal justice professionals to grow their leadership and management skills or broaden their knowledge base and skill set as a victim services provider.

Faculty members in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology are among the most productive and skilled educators in the country. From faculty who are nationally ranked researchers to those who have extensive backgrounds as criminal justice professionals, these educators are dedicated to guiding students through foundational courses to develop their skills in reasoning and analysis. Students have the opportunity to learn from the best in foundational areas of criminal justice such as law enforcement, corrections, and the law to emerging areas of knowledge in biosocial criminology, and the needs of crime victims. Students interested in conducting original research can continue their education through the Ph.D. in Criminal Justice.

As a graduate student in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at SHSU, the opportunities are endless:

  • Learn from faculty who conduct research in all aspects of the criminal justice system
  • Study in a top ranked Doctoral program
  • Observe valuable interaction and professional development that occurs in the College of Criminal Justice Institutes with executives in law enforcement, corrections, and victim studies from around the country
  • Participate in applied research that has "real world" implications through one of the Research Institutes in Law Enforcement, Corrections, and Victimology
  • Become a member of one of our Undergraduate Student Organizations or our Graduate Student Organization
  • Experience affordable living
  • Competitive Scholarships and Graduate Assistantships

Mission

The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology is committed to providing students with a quality liberal arts education. Students will gain an appreciation for their role as criminal justice professionals and as contributing members of society. The Department is committed to producing high quality research and to providing public service and technical assistance to communities and criminal justice agencies.

Contact Information

General Information on CJC undergraduate programs: CJadvising@shsu.edu or 936-294-3170

General Information on CJC graduate programs: Doris Pratt, Graduate Coordinator, (936) 294-3637

Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology Administration:

Academic Programs

The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology offers a PhD in Criminal Justice, four distinct degrees at the master's level, and a graduate certificate in Criminal Justice Leadership and Management. The Department offers online criminal justice programs for a range of prospective students.

For a listing of the programs offered within the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, please, reference the Programs tab on this page.

Highlights

SHSU’s College of Criminal Justice has been consistently ranked among the top criminal justice programs in the nation in both value and quality by U.S. News & World Report, the Journal of Criminal Justice, BestColleges.com, and many other publications.

Student Organization and Activities

Graduate Student Organization (GSO)

The mission of GSO is to bring together graduate students at the College of Criminal Justice; to facilitate and encourage research and theory development related to criminal justice; to encourage appropriate and effective teaching techniques and practices for criminal justice courses; and to serve as a resource network for and to encourage interaction among the various entities within the College of Criminal Justice. See www.shsu.edu/academics/criminal-justice/departments/criminal-justice-and-criminology/gso for additional information.

Scholarships

Scholarships,  assistantships, and financial assistance are available. Student assistantships and scholarships are awarded on a competitive basis based upon academic performance, GRE scores, letters of recommendation, among other factors.

Financial awards are available, including out-of-state tuition waivers. University policy requires all students to pay in-state tuition.

Information on specific scholarships available in the College of Criminal Justice are available through Cutty Gilbert (cutty@shsu.edu) at (936) 294-3755. Potential graduate students should contact Doris Pratt at (936) 294-3637. See also the College of Criminal Justice section for information on College and University level scholarships.

Criminal Justice

CRIJ 5330. Critical Analys Of Justice Adm. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 530); An analysis of the criminal justice system in the United States; role of justice agencies as part of societal response to crime; the knowledge base of criminal justice; issues, problems, trends.

CRIJ 5332. Perspectives In Criminology. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 532); Survey of the field of criminology emphasizing perspectives regarding the making of law, breaking of law and societal reactions to the breaking of law.

CRIJ 5334. Courts As Organizations. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 534); Critical evaluation of the dispensing of justice in America, using the systems theory approach, as well as current court policy.

CRIJ 5363. The Juvenile Offender. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 563); Theoretical perspectives regarding the creation of childhood as a social construct and the etiology of juvenile offending. Particular attention is paid to the role of family, peers and school.

CRIJ 5364. Seminar in Victimology. 3 Hours.

CRIJ 5365. Seminar in Crime Victims Services and Management. 3 Hours.

CRIJ 5366. Advocacy and Case Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an advanced understanding of advocacy work. Bridging research, policy, and practice, it will explore the history of the victim rights movement and principles of empowerment-based advocacy. Additionally, issues surrounding confidentiality, professionalism, and ethics in service provision will be explored.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 5364.

CRIJ 5367. Gender and Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

This course explores the role of gender in offending, victimization, and criminal justice processing. This course also evaluates the influence of gender on working in criminal justice professions.Criminological and victimological theories are assessed in light of gender and the relationship between gender and criminal justice as drawn from both the social and biological sciences.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 5364.

CRIJ 5368. Human Sex Trafficking. 3 Hours.

This course explores the scope and magnitude of global and domestic human sex trafficking. This course also synthesizes the research on antecedents to entry into the sex trade and mental and physical health outcomes as a result of trafficking victimization. Traffickers and solicitors are examined in light of criminological and victimology theory and research. Public policy, criminal justice responses and social service delivery for victims of trafficking are evaluated and assessed in terms of effectiveness. Prerequiste: CRIJ 5364.

CRIJ 5370. Elder Abuse and Victimization. 3 Hours.

This course offers a broad-based study of social, physical and psychological description including dynamics of aging, coupled with an advanced understanding of elder abuse, neglect and exploitation. This will include the incidence and prevalence of these crimes as well as prevailing theoretical perspectives that explain elder abuse and victimization. Particular attention will also be paid to elder abuse and the law, along with social service, law enforcement and medical responses to these offenses. The course will also explore long-range trends in aging in the U.S. and national, state and local initiatives to protect the population's eldest members.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 5364.

CRIJ 5371. Interpersonal Violence. 3 Hours.

This course explores non-lethal and lethal violence occuring over the life course between or among persons who are typically related by blood, legal union, or cohabitation. This includes intimate partners, children, parents and other family members, as well as close friends. Emphasis will be placed on the evaluation of community-based resources for preventing or responding to interpersonal violence, along with history of public policy. Students will also evaluate the challenges of coordinating efforts among legal, medical and social service providers.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 5364.

CRIJ 5372. Community Based Corrections. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 572); Techniques and procedures utilized in the supervision of adult and juvenile probationers and parolees, and other residents of community-based corrections facilities. Preparation of social history, pre-hearing, and pre-sentence investigation reports. Emphasis on practical problems confronting the probation and parole and other community-based corrections officer.

CRIJ 5383. Family Violence. 3 Hours.

This course bridges research, policy, and practice and orients students to topics in family violence. It examines victim-offender relationship dynamics, theoretical explanations for battering, danger assessment, barriers to help-seeking, and legal considerations.
Prerequisite: None.

CRIJ 5384. Child Abuse and Neglect. 3 Hours.

This course bridges research, policy, and practice in addressing the history and development of the child saving movement in the United States. Students in this course examine practical considerations for advocates, including mandatory reporting, confidentiality, and abuse and neglect indicators.
Prerequisite: None.

CRIJ 5385. Non-Profit Grant Writing. 3 Hours.

This course familiarizes students with the process of non-profit grant writing. Students write grants for the mock shelter programs they developed in CRIJ 5365 Crime Victims Services and Management Seminar. They learn how to develop a proposal and the various types of grants. Logic models and performance measures are explored.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 5365.

CRIJ 5392. Survey Of Research Methods. 3 Hours.

The theory and application of social science research techniques and designs, with a focus on the interpretation and use of research findings. Students who have not completed an introductory course in research methods within the past five years must take CRIJ 3378 as a prerequisite.

CRIJ 5393. Legl Aspects Criminal Just Sys. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 593); Aspects of law which are relevant to and essential for a better understanding of the criminal justice system and its related processes.

CRIJ 6093. Independent Studies in CJ. 1-3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 693); This course is designed for directed study of individual students who wish intensive study in some specific area of Marketing. Variable Credit (1-3). .
Prerequisite: Consent of the Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs of the College and of the instructor directing the readings.

CRIJ 6099. Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 699); The completion and defense of the Thesis. (The student must be registered in 6099 the semester in which he/she receives his/her master's degree.) Variable Credit (1-3).

CRIJ 6330. Neurobiology of Trauma. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an advanced understanding of the role of the brain, brain systems, and hormone/chemical responses in explaining reactions to experiencing and witnessing a variety of traumatic events. Information is contrasted to traditional, responses from criminal justice practitioners (e.g., law enforcement, courtroom actors), medical staff, and social service personnel when presented with victims of trauma. Evidence-based practices for effective forensic interview techinques and victim advocacy are synthesized in light of recent advances in neuroscience of trauma.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 5364.

CRIJ 6332. Resource Development in the Organizational Context. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 632); Critical issues and strategic questions regarding managing human resources in criminal justice agencies. Policy areas discussed are: (1) employee influence; (2) human resource flow; (3) reward systems; and (4) work systems. Human resource management as a coherent, proactive management model.

CRIJ 6333. Seminar In Org & Administratn. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 633); The study of bureaucracy and complex organizations with strong emphasis on the concepts and practices of the organization and management of public agencies in the United States. Special consideration is given to the various philosophies, typologies, and models of administrative systems in criminal justice.

CRIJ 6334. Resrch Mthd & Quantve Analysis. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 634); Methods and techniques of research and research design; conducting and assessing research in the criminal justice agency management environment; translation of research findings to policy; informational resources readily available to the agency manager. Designed to prepare students to gather decision-relevant information.

CRIJ 6335. Seminar In Leadership & Mgt. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 635); Problems and alternative solutions in criminal justice management. The case study method and current readings provide an admixture of practical and educational experiences intended to foster and disseminate new ideas for management strategies, especially as this is impacted by leadership styles, human resources, and the environment.

CRIJ 6336. Comp/Tech Applications For CJ. 3 Hours.

Techniques of data processing with emphasis upon utilization and application to criminal justice information management.

CRIJ 6338. Coordinating Victim Services. 3 Hours.

This course examines professional stakeholders in victim service delivery to ensure efficient, professional, and cooperative victim-centered responses to trauma and criminal victimization. This course evaluates the preventative and reactive mechanisms available to a range of government and non-government providers and synthesizes the management of these victim service provisions. Additionally, students will explore the challenges of coordinating efforts between different professional organizations and ways to critically and effectively address problems. Prerequisite: CRIJ 5364, CRIJ 5365, & CRIJ 5366.

CRIJ 6339. Police In Society. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 639); An examination of the evolution of police in modern society with a special emphasis given to the role of the police play in contemporary society. Current research examining the function of the police will be examined.

CRIJ 6360. Seminar In Deviant Behav. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 660); Analysis of behavior which violates expectations that are shared and recognized as legitimate. Special attention is focused on societal reactions to such behavior.

CRIJ 6361. Social Policy. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 661); Evaluation of the legal, social, economic, philosophic, and controversial issues of governmental programs, administered by federal, state, local units of government, and the client systems served.

CRIJ 6363. Leadrshp Psy In C J Management. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 663); This course examines the important psychological processes that are involved in dealing with others. The manner in which an individualís thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by others, especially in a criminal justice leadership environment, is the focal point.

CRIJ 6365. Comm Theory & Admin Of Justice. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 665); This course examines the nature of criminal justice organizations as components of the political, social and economic inter-organizational networks that comprise communities. Topics such as the intersection of criminal justice, mental health, juvenile justice and educational systems are examined. The impact of criminal victimization and attributes of communities that foster crime are examined in detail. The processes that motivate and implement change in community based organizations are also addressed.

CRIJ 6368. Semnr Drugs,Society,Policy Iss. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 668); This course will focus on issues and problems surrounding the problem of illicit drugs in society. Particular emphasis will be placed on policy related issues.

CRIJ 6372. Seminar In Crim & Corrections. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 672); Theory and problems in Criminology and Corrections. One or more term papers evidencing qualities of scholarship will be required.

CRIJ 6385. Stats For C J Research. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 685); Review of descriptive and graphical techniques; probability and sampling theory; the normal curve and statistical inference; Central Limit Theo­rem; Chi-square, T and F distributions; analysis of variance and linear regression.

CRIJ 6387. The Ethics Of Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 687);Ethics and moral philosophy in criminal justice including the role of natural law, constitutional law, code of ethics and philosophical principles. Strong emphasis will be put on examining the role of justice in a free society and the practical implications of justice to practitioners of police, courts and corrections.

CRIJ 6388. Emergent Issues In CJ Leadrshp. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 688); This serves as a capstone course for the Master of Science in Criminal Justice Leadership program, providing an opportunity for the integration of information offered in the program and its relationship to emergent issues. Addresses the effect of emergent perspectives in organization theory on public administration in general, and more specifically upon criminal justice management and leadership. Examines the impact of emergent technology upon criminal justice operations. Studies the integration of organization theory, principles of public administration, and community expectations of criminal justice leaders.

CRIJ 6392. Program Evaluation In CJ. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 692); Principles and techniques of program evaluation including models and case studies.

CRIJ 6394. Special Topics-Criminal Justce. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 694); This course is needed to offer masterís level students the option of registering for a multi-topic course. The student can take the course under various special topics being offered.

CRIJ 6396. Legal Aspects Of CJ Management. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 696); An overview of the legal issues commonly facing managers in criminal justice agencies. Particular emphasis is placed on public employment law including the hiring, promoting, disciplining and discharging of employees, fair employment practices, and agency and administrator civil liability. Both state and federal statutory and case law are examined.

CRIJ 6398. Thesis Practicum. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 698); Overview of research strategies; principles of research writing; and procedures for initiating, executing and completing a Thesis. Preparation and approval of a Prospectus. (Preliminary planning for the Thesis should begin during the first semester of graduate work; the student should enroll in CRIJ 6398 after he/she has completed 12 semester hours of graduate work.)

CRIJ 7070. Independent Studies in CJ. 1-3 Hours.

Directed readings designed to give the student flexibility in developing an area of specialization. Variable Credit (1-3). A student can take only two CRIJ 7070 courses.
Prerequisite: Enrollment requires prior permission of the appropriate Dean and the supervising faculty which is given only when necessary to meet specific needs of the student and the College.

CRIJ 7330. Seminar In Organization Theory. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 730); An examination of organizational thought with application to criminal justice. Analysis of the developmental state of organizational theory, including historical derivations and the implications of various theoretical bases for organizational functioning.

CRIJ 7333. Proseminar In C.J. Issues. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 733); The course is designed to give doctoral students a current, thorough, and comprehensive review of the criminal justice system — focusing on how the system functions in theory and practice, current future needs and trends. Students are required to submit extensive critiques and to participate in panel discussions.

CRIJ 7334. Smnr In American Policing. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 734); The course includes the philosophy and role of American policing, politics of policing, managing police organizations, police community relations, police operational and administrative practices, police research, police executive development, emergent issues and problems in policing.

CRIJ 7336. Seminar In American Correction. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 736); In-depth examination of the various issues and problems in corrections as they relate to administration and management. A variety of problems is explored, including the philosophical justification for prisons, personnel management, sentencing and its implications, community-based corrections, rehabilitation, judicial intervention, and correctional reform.

CRIJ 7337. Criminological Theory. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 737); Overview of the major paradigms focusing on the causes of crime and deviant behavior with special attention given to the social, political and intellectual milieu within which each perspective arose. The course will include a discussion of criminological theories from a philosophy of science perspective focusing upon such issues as theory construction, theoretical integration and the formal evaluation of theory.

CRIJ 7338. Seminar In American Courts. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 738); Role and structure of prosecution, public defense, and the courts in the United States jurisprudence with emphasis upon criminal law, and problems in the administration of justice.

CRIJ 7339. Distr & Correlates Of Crime. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 739); Survey of research on the scope and nature of criminal activity and factors correlated with criminal behavior. Attention specifically on four general categories: race/ethnicity, gender, age and class. Examines the issues of etiology, victimology, differential police enforcement, sentencing and correctional practices.

CRIJ 7340. Administration of Justice. 3 Hours.

This advanced seminar addresses criminal justice systems theory, discretionary decisionmaking in criminal justice, and factors related to differences and discrimination in system processing.

CRIJ 7360. Adv Smnr In Criminological Thr. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 760). Extensive studies in areas of classical and/or current criminological theory. A basic knowledge of criminology is assumed. Emphasis is on analytical, critical evaluation, and the advancement of theory.

CRIJ 7366. Seminar on Penalty of Death. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the death penalty with a focus on areas of research needed in order to better evaluate the appropriateness of this sanction. It will include: 1) a specific focus on the death penalty from a variety of different perspectives; 2) a critical examination of the existing body of scholarship; and 3) the indentification of what is needed for evolving scholarship in each area.

CRIJ 7371. Special Topics-Criminal Justce. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 771). This course is needed to offer doctoral level students the option of registering for a multi-topic course. The student can take the course under various special topics being offered.

CRIJ 7373. Research Practicum. 3 Hours.

(SH Prior Course ID: CJ 773); Supervised training including special applications in information acquisition, storage, retrieval, analysis, and display in criminal justice.

CRIJ 7375. Seminar in Legal Aspects of CJ. 3 Hours.

This seminar addresses legal research, constitutional law, criminal procedure, criminal law, and juvenile justice as relevant to understanding the criminal justice system and its related processes.

CRIJ 7387. Research Design. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of scientific inquiry with an emphasis on the practical aspects of research design and implementation. Topics include the philosophy of science; the relationship of sampling theory to statistical theory; studies in causation; non-experimental research; data systems and modern data processing techniques.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 7434 and consent of instructor.

CRIJ 7389. Advanced Statistics II. 3 Hours.

Survey of reliability analysis, loglinear, and logit loglinear analysis, nonlinear, weighted and two stage least-squares regression, probit analysis, survival analysis and Cox regression.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 7434.

CRIJ 7393. Computer Based Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

The course is intended to develop proficiency in data analysis using computerized statistical programs such as SPSS. Statistical theory and research design issues are combined with hands-on computer experience. The course emphasizes data management, multivariate statistics and diagnostics.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 1387, CRIJ 7389, and CRIJ 7434.

CRIJ 7442. Advanced Statistics I. 4 Hours.

Introduction to multivariate statistical techniques including multiple regression, logistic regression, discriminate analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, canonical correlation, factor analysis, cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling.
Prerequisite: CRIJ 6385 or equivalent in past years.

CRIJ 8099. Dissertation IV. 1-3 Hours.


Prerequisite: CRIJ 8396, CRIJ 8397, and CRIJ 8398.

CRIJ 8396. Dissertation. 3 Hours.

CRIJ 8397. Dissertation II. 3 Hours.


Prerequisite: CRIJ 8396.

CRIJ 8398. Dissertation III. 3 Hours.


Prerequisite: CRIJ 8396 and CRIJ 8397.

Forensic Science

FORS 5114. Firearms and Toolmarks. 1 Hour.

This course will provide a broad overview of firearm and toolmark identification for forensic purposes. Terminology, function testing and ammunition will be discussed, together with class and individual characteristics, identification criteria and instrumentation. Determination of caliber/gauge, trajectory and distance determination will also be covered. Basic toolmark nomenclature, class and individual characteristics, fracture matching and serial number restoration will also be addressed.

FORS 5116. Seminar In Forensic Science. 1 Hour.

This graduate seminar series will focus on current topics and research in forensic science.

FORS 5117. Controlled Substance Analysis. 1 Hour.

This course will introduce the concepts, theories, and principles used in the forensic analysis of controlled substances. Methods of forensic analysis of drugs, including pill identification, microscopic examination, color tests, microcrystalline tests, thin layer chromatography (TLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) will be explored. The source, origin, chemical properties and clandestine manufacture of controlled substances will also be discussed. Students will gain a fundamental understanding of controlled substance analysis in accordance with the standard of practice in an accredited crime laboratory.

FORS 5118. Questioned Documents. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of techniques and procedures used for forensic document examination. The course will explore handwriting comparisons, printed document alterations and ink analysis.

FORS 5119. Fire Debris. 1 Hour.

This course addresses evidence collection, analytical techniques, instrumentation and data interpretation related to fire debris. Students learn to interpret analytical results within forensic contexts.

FORS 5226. Law And Forensic Sciences. 2 Hours.

This course will provide an overview of the law-forensic science interface. This includes legal concepts of admissibility of evidence and proof, rules of evidence, structure and hierarchy of criminal courts, and expert testimony. The course also includes direct and cross examination of students in a moot court setting.

FORS 5231. Techniques-Crime Scene Investg. 2 Hours.

This course will provide an advanced comprehensive review of contemporary techniques for the identification, collection, preservation, and evaluation of evidence found at the crime scene. The assistance of different items of physical evidence in the reconstruction of a crime will be studied. The course includes the application of CSI theory in various applied scenarios. Concepts of physical evidence, evidence collection, quality assurance, and chain custody procedures in forensic analysis will also be covered. Four-hour laboratory.

FORS 5333. Forensic Anthropology. 3 Hours.

This course will address theories, methodologies and applications of forensic anthropology. It covers advanced human osteology and includes hands-on training with skeletal remains. Students learn and apply the methods used to construct a human biological profile, which includes the determination of sex, age, and race based on skeletal features. The processes of human decomposition, and the identification of skeletal pathologies and trauma will also be introduced. Three-hour laboratory.

FORS 5335. Trace/Microscopical Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course will review the classifications and characteristics of trace evidence and provide hands-on experience in microscopic examination of physical evidence. A wide variety of chromatographic, spectroscopic, and microscopic techniques, such as stereo microscope, polarized light microscope, digital microscope, comparison microscope, scanning electron microscopy – energy dispersive spectroscopy, micro Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, will be used in this course. The forensic examination of fiber, hair, glass, paint, gun shot residue (GSR), ink, and explosives will be covered. Four-hour laboratory.

FORS 5337. Fundamentals of Criminalistics. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the fundamentals of physical evidence concepts, pattern evidence, and forensic biology. Students acquire standards and general practices in criminalistics.

FORS 5360. Pattern and Physical Evidence Concepts. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce the interpretation of pattern evidence and the forensic analysis of physical evidence. Scientific experiments and analysis of pattern in support of crime scene reconstruction will be discussed. Pattern recognition of physical evidence, such as bloodstains, gunshot residues, tire prints, shoeprints, fire debris, explosive, glass fracture, body gesture, and wound patterns, will be covered. Physical and chemical techniques for the visualization or enhancement of varies types of patterns will also be introduced. Expert interpretation of observed pattern of physical evidence will be discussed. Four-hour laboratory.

FORS 5440. Forensic Biology. 4 Hours.

This course will cover the practical DNA analysis of biological evidence. Different extraction methods will be discussed as well as techniques for the quantification of DNA. Students will be introduced to emerging forensic DNA methods such as identifying the tissue of origin, and assessing the level of DNA degradation and PCR inhibitors in a biological sample. Strategies for the analysis of PCR products (autosomal and Y chromosome STRs), interpretation of results, biostatistics and quality assurance procedures will be covered. Basic statistical genetics theory will be approached to generate a final DNA report. Four-hour laboratory. Credit 4 .

FORS 5445. Forensic Instrumental Analysis. 4 Hours.

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the analytical methodology, approaches and instrumentation used for forensic analysis. Fundamental qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis using advanced instrumentation will be reviewed. A wide variety of techniques that are used in a number of forensic disciplines will be covered. Well established methods and novel approaches will be discussed. Four-hour laboratory.

FORS 6014. Forensic Science Research. 1-3 Hours.

This capstone experience allows students to formally apply their acquired knowledge and skills in forensic science. This course consists of an independent research project which culminates in a formal written report or manuscript. Additionally, students are required to present and defend their scientific research orally in a public forum. Variable Credit (1-3).

FORS 6094. Special Topics in Forensic Sci. 4 Hours.

FORS 6111. Fundamentals of Research Methods. 1 Hour.

This course provides a broad overview of theoretical and practical concepts necessary for scientific research. These include an overview of the scientific method, the importance of logical research design, and basic scientific writing skills. This course covers topics including qualitative and quantitative research approaches, developing and refining research questions and project outlines to adequately test hypotheses, reviewing scientific literature, developing technical writing strategies, and understanding relevant ethical issues.

FORS 6215. Statistical Genetics. 2 Hours.

This course will focus on the application of statistical methods and theory to forensic genetics. Students must have an introductory knowledge of probability theory and statistics. Fundamental topics like ideal populations, random mating, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, linkage disequilibrium, disturbing forces, inbreeding, four-allele descent measurements, product rule, independence testing and genetic distance will also be covered. Students will analyze and interpret the results from microsatellite population databases using population genetics software.
Prerequisite: FORS 5440.

FORS 6224. Quality Assurance and Ethical Conduct in Forensic Science. 2 Hours.

This course will introduce the concepts and procedures associated with quality assurance and ethical conduct in forensic science.

FORS 6333. Behavioral Genetics. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an understanding of behavior genetics and the influence of genes and the environment of emotion, personality and behavior in humans and animals. Credits 3.

FORS 6335. Advanced Forensic Chemistry. 3 Hours.

This course will address novel scientific techniques in crime scene chemistry and crime lab chemistry. Non-destructive optical methods developed for sensing or identifying physical evidence are particularly emphasized in this course. New developments in chromatographic, spectroscopic, and microscopic techniques for the analysis of fibers, hair, gunshot residue, ink, paints, glass, explosives and narcotics will also be explored.
Prerequisite: FORS 5335 and FORS 5445.

FORS 6337. Forensic Medicine. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of forensic medicine and forensic pathology pertaining to medicolegal death investigation. Students analyze legal issues associated with the practice of forensic medicine.

FORS 6361. Advanced Forensic DNA. 3 Hours.

This course will cover the practical DNA analysis of extremely degraded biological evidence including hair shafts, nails, teeth and bones. Different extraction methods will be discussed and practically applied. Techniques for quantification of minimal amounts of DNA, RNA profiling, alternative strategies for DNA analysis (low copy number, SNPs, X-STRs) and DNA sequencing (mtDNA), interpretation of results, biostatistics, and standard operation procedures will also be covered.
Prerequisite: FORS 5440.

FORS 6371. Forensic Science Internship. 3 Hours.

This is a ten week full-time internship in an approved forensic science laboratory. This opportunity allows graduate students to apply their theoretical knowledge, practical skills and abilities in a forensic science setting.

FORS 6446. Forensic Toxicology. 4 Hours.

This course will explore the physico-chemical characteristics of drugs and poisons of forensic interest. The course will focus on human performance and postmortem forensic toxicology applications. The course will address pharmacological and analytical challenges associated with biological evidence. It will address qualitative and quantitative analysis of compounds from biological and non-biological matrices and provide hands-on experience with chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques that are widely used in forensic laboratories. Four-hour laboratory.

FORS 7094. Adv Topic. 3 Hours.

This special topic course is adaptable to the needs and interests of the individual doctoral students majoring in Forensic Science. Variable credit (1-3).
Prerequisite: Departmental Approval.

FORS 7331. Research Methods. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the scientific method, research methods and design. The course provides students the opportunity to discover, structure, and formulate research questions. Through this process students come to understand the many ways in which researchers can acquire knowledge and insights using a wide variety of research methods applicable to forensic science.
Prerequisite: Three credits of statistics.

FORS 7332. Scientific Communications. 3 Hours.

This course develops oral and written communication skills necessary for forensic science researchers and practitioners. Students must develop mastery of the following: technical report writing with regard to standard operating procedures, scientific publications and grant proposals; oral presentations, depositions and courtroom testimony of scientific evidence.
Prerequisite: FORS 5226.

FORS 7334. Social Science of Forensics. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the nexus between social and behavioral principles and the conduct of forensic science. Topics addressed include the organization of the forensic enterprise including the structure and functioning of forensic crime labs; performance assessment of forensic systems, organizations and practitioners; sociological, social-psychological, and psychological factors affecting the performance of forensic practitioners; and management theory of forensic workplaces and workers.

FORS 7346. Advanced Forensic Toxicology. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on advanced principles and practices in forensic toxicology, in particular advanced analytical, methodological and interpretive issues. Students will apply their knowledge of basic forensic toxicology principles to a variety of analytical and interpretive topics relevant to behavioral and postmortem toxicology including but not limited to impaired driving, sexual assault and death investigation. Credits 3.
Prerequisite: FORS 6446.

FORS 7381. Explosive Analysis & Detection. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the broad field of explosive engineering and detection to include the safety and transportation classifications. Chemical and physical properties, explosive reagents and byproducts and detection techniques are addressed. It includes military and improvised devices, post-blast evidence and constitutional aspects of interdiction.
Prerequisite: CHEM 4440 or FORS 5445.

FORS 7385. Warfare Agents. 3 Hours.

This course evaluates chemical, biological and radiological warfare agents. These agents are discussed from a chemical and biochemical standpoint including structure, function, mechanism of action, injury, clinical therapy, and recovery. Three credit hours of biochemistry or toxicology at the undergraduate or graduate level are recommended for students taking this course.

FORS 7389. Practicum. 3 Hours.

The practicum affords the doctoral student the opportunity to apply research in a practical setting, adapt technologies for maximal use, appreciate the steps necessary for the implementation of new technology within an accredited environment, and observe the technical and non-technical processes involved. During the practicum students must complete the equivalent of a ten-week, full-time placement (400 hours) in an approved forensic science laboratory or facility.
Prerequisite: FORS 6371.

FORS 7390. Forensic Laboratory Management. 3 Hours.

This course addresses key areas of forensic laboratory management and leadership. It prepares students for administrative and leadership roles in public or private sector forensic science laboratories. It focuses on the integration of technical and discipline specific policies and procedures into the administrative framework of the crime laboratory. Issues include the quality management system, organizational efficiency, fiscal, personnel and resource management, regulation, certification and accreditation.

FORS 8099. Dissertation. 1-3 Hours.

Security Studies

SCST 5320. Crisis Management Integration I. 3 Hours.

This course emphasizes efforts established to enhance the nation's capability to prevent, prepare for, respond to, mitigate, and recover from critical domestic incidents. Utilizing the all-hazard approach against natural, human-induced, and technological crises, this course highlights integration processes in command and control, planning, interoperable communications, community preparedness and participation, resource assessment, intelligence and information sharing, mutual aid systems, and interagency coordination in crisis. In this course, post 9/11 era threats and hazards will be analyzed within a framework of resilience building at tribal and local community level.

SCST 5335. Global Perspec in Homeland Sec. 3 Hours.

Course will focus on meeting the changing demands of security in a global environment. Discussion emphasizing the understanding of how to design, implement, and intergrate the security function in an ever-changing world and the impact of major economic, demographic, and technological trends on developing strategies for security innovation and growth.

SCST 5336. Law and Ethics in Homeland Security. 3 Hours.

Focus will be on how the law impacts security in many diverse ways. Discussion will emphasize the concept of criminal intent, early criminal law and the emergence of law enforcement and private security, the difference between public policing and private security, and an overview of legal terms and issues with which the security manager must address.

SCST 5338. Security and Management. 3 Hours.

Focus is on managing the security organization and its human resources; discussion and on results-oriented security management, the basic foundations of security, the importance of technology, and specialized security applications will be addressed.
Prerequisite: Three hours of graduate-level Security Studies.

SCST 5339. Foundations of Homeland Secur.. 3 Hours.

Course will focus on philosophies, tactics, and targets of terrorist groups, discussion of emerging terrorism trends and the roles of the private sector and U.S. Government in responding to and preventing terrorism. Students will also gain insight on how terrorisn influnces U.S. Foreign Policy.

SCST 5340. Intel & CounterInt in Nat Sec. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the roles of various national intelligence collection platforms and intelligence analysis; how national policy makers utilize intelligence and Congress' oversight role. Counterintelligence is introduced as an example of an external threat to homeland security.

SCST 5341. Principles of Intellig Anlys. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on new and alternative methods for conducting intelligence analysis. It will also examine how analysis contributes to the overall understanding of intelligence and formulation of US national security policy. Analytic modeling techniques and the psychology of analysis in terms of analytic biases are covered. Credt 3.

SCST 5342. Law Enf Intell and Crime Analy. 3 Hours.

This course foundation is the diversity of mission and roles of crime analysts at the local, state and federal levels. Traditional crime analysis functions are reviewed, including temporal and spatial plots. linking modus operandi, and crime distribution forecasting. Additionally, the dynamics of both terrorist and criminal intelligence functions are emphasized, including database linkages, role of Federal Data Fusion Centers, the National Information Sharing infrastructure, and the elements of systematic threat assessment.

SCST 5344. Unconventional Threats. 3 Hours.

This course examines a variety of unconventional threats to national security including drug cartels, cyber threats, CBRNE weapons, pandemics, human trafficking, natural disasters, failed states, refugee flows, resource depletion, and environmental crises. Special emphasis is placed on international and domestic terrorism.
Prerequisite: SCST 5339.

SCST 5346. Information & Intel Mgmt. 3 Hours.

This course explores interoperability, data fusion, and integrative decision making protocols and systems for Homeland Security information and intelligence sharing in the overarching process of managing the flow of information and intelligence across all levels and sectors of government and the private sector. The content to support the rapid identification of emerging terrorism-related threats and other circumstances requiring intervention by government and private sector authorities.

SCST 5348. Critical Infrastructure Protection. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the policy, strategy, and practical application of critical infrastructure security and resilience from the All-Hazards perspective. Students explore challenges and opportunities associated with: infrastructure-related public-private partnerships, information sharing, risk analysis and prioritization, risk mitigation, performance metrics, program management, incident management, and investing for the future.

SCST 5396. Research Methods - Homeland Security Studies. 3 Hours.

This course builds student competencies in key research philosophies, principles, and techniques which will enable successful design and implementation of research relevant to the field. Students will be exposed to various ways of managing, analyzing, and displaying data. The course will prepare students to establish an applied research portfolio and to compose and submit an applied research project to a journal or conference in Homeland Security.

SCST 6093. Independent Studies in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Hours.

This course is designed to give students flexibility to pursue study of a topic under the supervision of a faculty member where the topic will be studied more deeply than in a traditional course or where there are no available courses on the topic. Credit 1-3.
Prerequisite: Approval of the Department Chair and the instructor directing the readings.

SCST 6099. Thesis. 3 Hours.

This course encompasses completion and defense of the Thesis. (Student must be registered in SCST 6099 for the semester in which they receive the MS in Homeland Security degree.)
Prerequisite: SCST 6398.

SCST 6320. Crisis Management Integration II. 3 Hours.

This course highlights the coordination and support of federal, territorial, state, regional, tribal and local efforts and resources used for complex incidents such as terrorist attacks, major disasters, or other high security and high consequence events. Specifically, federal coordinating structures, federal resource requests and deployment strategies, and regulations pertaining to federal assistance will be discussed. The role, function, and activation of federal operation centers, state level emergency operation centers, county emergency operation centers, as well as Multiagency Assistance Compacts (MACs) in support of tribal and local emergency response efforts will be analyzed.
Prerequisite: SCST 5320.

SCST 6362. Critical Infrastructure Risk Management. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the complexities of critical infrastructure security and resilience from a "system-of-systems" perspective. Students explore the notion of a system and how it applies to explicate how our critical infrastructures function and how they can fail or perform less than optimally under stress. The learner is provided with tools to uncover and manage risks affecting systems.
Prerequisite: SCST 5348.

SCST 6364. Cybersecurity. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on policy, strategy, and the operational environment of cyberspace in the context of critical infrastructure security and resilience. Topics include: challenges presented by the 21st century risk environment, cyber-risk analysis and prioritization, government-private cybersecurity partnerships, and future cyber risks.
Prerequisite: SCST 5348.

SCST 6365. Doct/Praxis in Homeland Sec. 3 Hours.

This is a capstone experience research project containing a portfolio of reflexive elements on Homeland Security Doctrine, as well as an applied research product exploring contemporary topics in Homeland Security Studies of relevance to students’ professional practice. The research product will reflect scholarship standards making it suitable for future presentation at a professional Homeland Security conference, symposium, or workshop. Credit 3
Prerequisite: SCST 5396.

SCST 6370. Internship in Security Studies. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to synthesize theory and practice. It requires a placement of a minimum of three months at 40 hours per week in an approved criminal justice, critical infrastructure, or private security setting.
Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chair or Internship Director.

SCST 6394. Special Topics in Sec Stud. 3 Hours.

This course offers students the opportunities for structured coursework on emergent issues or other topics for which courses do not exist in the course catalog.

SCST 6398. Thesis Practicum. 3 Hours.

This course encompasses an overview of research strategies; principles of research writing; and procedures for initiating, executing and completing a thesis. The course culminates in the preparation and approval of a prospectus.
Prerequisite: 12 semester credit hours of graduate work.

Chair: William M Wells

Brandy L Blasko, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Temple University; MA, John Jay College of C J; BS, University of Pittsburgh

Danielle Lynne Boisvert, PHD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Cincinnati; MFS, George Washington University; BS, University of Western Ontario

Jeffrey A Bouffard, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Maryland-College Park; MA, Saint Michael'S Coll; BA, Suffolk University; BA, Suffolk University

Leana A Bouffard, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Maryland-College Park; MA, Univ of Maryland-College Park; BS, Duke University

Harry Daniel Butler, MA, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, MA, Univ of Southern Mississippi; BA, Univ of Southern Mississippi

Steven Cuvelier, PHD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Ohio State Univ; MA, Univ of Northern Iowa; BS, Iowa State University

Courtney A Franklin, PHD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Washington State University; MA, Washington State University; BA, Gonzaga University

Travis W Franklin, PHD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Washington State University; MA, Washington State University; BA, Gonzaga University

Randall L Garner, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Houston-Main; MA, Univ of Houston-Clear Lake; BS, Univ of Houston-Clear Lake

Jurg Gerber, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Washington State University; MA, Washington State University; BA, Eastern Washington University

Brittany E Hayes, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Cuny City Coll; MPHIL, Cuny City Coll; BA, Rutgers University; BA, Rutgers University

Larry T. Hoover, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Michigan State University; MS, Michigan State University; BS, Michigan State University

William R King, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Associate Dean, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Cincinnati; PHD, Univ of Cincinnati; MS, Univ of Cincinnati; MS, Univ of Cincinnati; BS, Univ of Lowell; BS, Univ of Lowell

Dennis R Longmire, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Maryland-College Park; MA, Univ of Maryland-College Park; BS, Towson State University; BS, Towson State University

Holly A Miller, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice; Assistant Dean, College of Criminal Justice, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Florida State University; MA, Morehead State University; BA, Bethel College

Lisa ReNae Muftic, PHD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, North Dakota State University; MA, Univ of Chicago; BS, North Dakota State University

Janet Lynne Mullings, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Sam Houston State University; MA, Sam Houston State University; BS, Sam Houston State University

Eryn Nicole ONeal, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Arizona State University; MS, California St Un-Los Angeles; BS, California St Un-Los Angeles

Willard M Oliver, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, West Virginia University; MA, West Virginia University; MS, Radford University; BS, Radford University

Erin Anderson Orrick, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Texas At Dallas; MA, Univ of Maryland-College Park; BSCJ, Texas Christian University

Ryan Wayne Randa, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Cincinnati; MS, Univ of Cincinnati; BS, Univ of Wisconsin-Superior

Ling Ren, PHD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Nebraska-Omaha; MS, People's Public Security Univ; BA, People's Public Security Univ

Mitchel P Roth, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Calif-Santa Barbara; MA, Univ of Calif-Santa Barbara; BA, Univ of Maryland-College Park

Melinda S Tasca, PHD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Arizona State University; MS, Arizona State University; BS, Arizona State University

Victoria Brewer Titterington, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Tulane University; MSB, Husson College; MSW, Univ of Houston-Main; BA, Texas Tech University

Michael Scott Vaughn, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Sam Houston State University; MS, University of Central Missouri; BS, University of Central Missouri

William M Wells, PHD, Professor and Chair of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Nebraska-Omaha; MA, Indiana University-Bloomington; BA, Ohio University

Yan Zhang, PHD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Michigan State University; MS, Michigan State University; MS, Michigan State University; BS, Wuhan University

Jihong Zhao, PHD, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Washington State University; MA, Washington State University; BA, Shanghai Inst of Higher Edu

Interim Faculty

Mary Magdalene Breaux, PHD, Lecturer of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Prairie View AM University; MA, Webster University; BS, Sam Houston State University

Kathleen Latz, PHD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Illinois-Chicago; MA, Univ of Illinois-Chicago; BA, Univ of Illinois-Chicago

Stephen Lee Morrison, PHD, Lecturer of Criminal Justice, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, PHD, Univ of Southern Mississippi; MA, Univ of Houston-Clear Lake; BS, Univ of Houston-Clear Lake

Sparks P Veasey, JD, Clinical Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, JD, South Texas College of Law; MD, Univ of Texas Medical Branch