Department of General Business and Finance

Chair: Joey Robertson     (936) 294-1278

Website: Department of General Business and Finance

Vision

To deliver outstanding Banking, Finance, Entrepreneurship, and General Business Administration programs with faculty that is recognized for excellence in instruction, research, and service.

Mission

The mission of the Department of General Business and Finance is to assist in fulfilling the mission of the University and the College of Business Administration by providing students with an academic foundation to become productive citizens, to develop successful careers, and to provide interested students with the background to pursue graduate or professional studies. The academic foundation leading to a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Banking and Financial Institutions, Entrepreneurship, Finance, or General Business Administration is designed to arouse intellectual curiosity, develop analytical reason, and provide historical and current information relative to the global environment.

Graduate Programs

The Department of General Business and Finance, through the Smith-Hutson Chair of Banking, provides the leadership for the Executive MBA in Banking. It also provides a large portion of the curriculum for the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree program.

Student Organizations and Activities

  • Beta Alpha Psi
  • Banking and Finance Club
  • Collegiate Entrepreneurs' Organization
  • MBA Student Association

Scholarships

Scholarships are available on a competitive basis. Students are encouraged to apply for scholarships using the Scholarship4Kats program at Financial Aid. The Scholarships4Kats program is a single application that will allow the student to apply for most scholarships available on campus whether at the departmental, college, or university-level. The deadline for applying for scholarships is February 15.

Finance

FINC 5080. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

This course is designed for the directed study of individual students who wish intensive supervision in some vital aspect of Finance. Variable Credit (1-3).
Prerequisite: BUAD 5310, FINC 5300, and approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.

FINC 5085. Special Topic. 1-3 Hours.

This course of faculty-led study is designed to provide graduate students exposure to new Finance topics and concepts in a course setting. Variable credit (1 to 3).

FINC 5300. Business Finance Environment. 3 Hours.

An examination of business financial decision methods, the financial sector, and the economic and legal environment. Students are introduced to financial principles and decision techniques, as well as analytical models and software tools. This course does not apply to the 36-hour graduate credit hour requirement of the MBA degree program.

FINC 5310. Financial Management. 3 Hours.

An examination of financial management in today’s interdependent and integrated global environment. The framework, tools, and concepts of financial institutions, investments, and managerial finance will be emphasized. Topics include managerial and cost accounting applications as well as the use of current techniques for financial analysis, capital allocation, and capital structure. The course uses research writing, case analysis, and presentations to apply the literature to managerial situations.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing, FINC 3320 or equivalent.

FINC 5320. Seminar in Commercial Banking. 3 Hours.

A seminar in the current developments within commercial banking and an examination of the specific aspects of the banking industry. The course will utilize both student research and case studies that emphasize managerial application of the literature reviewed.

FINC 5333. Financial Statement Analysis. 3 Hours.

The course examines how financing, investing, and operating decisions affect financial statements. It focuses on how creditors and investors use financial statements to assess the results of managers’ decisions and the effect of alternative accounting methods on the quality of financial reporting.
Prerequisite: FINC 5310 or FINC 5370.

FINC 5338. Sel Top Money Cap Sec Markets. 3 Hours.

An in-depth topical exploration of various aspects of money, capital, and security markets. Topics are explored via analysis of current events and case studies, through examination of the intricacies of financial innovation and adaptation, and/or via individual research projects.
Prerequisite: FINC 5310 or FINC 5370.

FINC 5340. International Finance. 3 Hours.

Applies theories of managerial and international finance to the problems of financial management in a global business environment. Topics include investment analysis, financing choices, identification, measurement and management of foreign exchange risks, trade financing, and financial control of international operations.
Prerequisite: FINC 5310 or FINC 5370.

FINC 5345. Seminar in Investments. 3 Hours.

A study of financial securities, their valuation techniques and the markets in which they are traded. Provides an overview of portfolio theory and the analytical tools of portfolio management, as well as the relationship between risk and return. Includes a survey of current research in investments.
Prerequisite: FINC 5310.

FINC 5370. Problems in Admin Finance. 3 Hours.

Extensive coverage of financial concepts and techniques. Major topics include time value of money, risk, asset valuation including fixed income securities and stock, financial markets, term structure of interest rates, evaluation of financial performance through financial statement analysis, and asset management. Cases and readings in business finance will be used as appropriate.
Prerequisite: FINC 5310.

FINC 5390. Seminar in Business Finance. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of assembling, investing, and managing capital. Major topics include estimating a firm’s cost of funds, basic and advanced capital budgeting techniques including payback period, NPV, IRR, and MIRR, capital structure analysis, dividend policy and practice, risk management and portfolio diversification. Cases, current developments and readings in business finance will be used as appropriate.
Prerequisite: FINC 5310 or FINC 5370.

FINC 5395. Seminar in Commercial Lending. 3 Hours.

This is a seminar course with an in-depth coverage of the current lending and regulatory issues and techniques appropriate for management of commercial lending activities in modern financial institutions. Research, readings, and case studies are employed to provide students the opportunity to apply the literature in the dynamic financial institutions industry.
Prerequisite: FINC 5310 or FINC 5370.

General Business Administration

BUAD 5080. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

This course is designed for the directed study of individual students who wish intensive supervision in some vital aspect of Business Administration. Variable credit (1-3). .
Prerequisite: BUAD 5310 and Approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.

BUAD 5085. Special Topic. 1-3 Hours.

This course of faculty-led study is designed to provide graduate students exposure to new General Business topics and concepts in a course setting. Variable credit (1-3).

BUAD 5310. Managerial Communication. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to expand students’ understanding of management and corporate communications and enhance managerial writing and speaking skills. Research projects and case studies prepare students to conduct business research and to report results.

BUAD 5348. Entrepreneurship:Theory/Practc. 3 Hours.

An intensive examination of the theories of entrepreneurship, innovation, and intellectual entrepreneurship. Students will research the major steps of starting a business including developing their own Personal Entrepreneurship Plan. Course emphasizes converting intellectual capital into financial capital. Topics for extensive research include self-assessment, opportunity screening, developing a marketing system, growth strategies, and financial strategies.

BUAD 5355. Managerial Law. 3 Hours.

This course prepares managers to be cognizant of the legal implications of their decisions regardless of their specific area of responsibility. The course focuses on researching legal issues and developing strategies from the standpoint of management - from supervisory level to Board of Directors. Emphasis is placed on research strategies that executives can use to generate pragmatic legal strategies to minimize legal expenses and legal liabilities. The research strategies are oriented toward sources that can quickly be analyzed and implemented rather than traditional legal research for law firms. Assignments result in real world business research memos.

Chair: Tommy J Robertson

Traci Leigh Austin, PHD, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, Univ of Nebraska-Lincoln; MA, Ohio State University; BA, Univ of Nebraska-Lincoln; BA, Univ of Nebraska-Lincoln

James Bexley, PHD, Professor of Finance and Smith-Hutson Endowed Chair of Banking, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, University of Stirling; MBA, Univ of Houston-Main; BBA, Univ of Texas-El Paso; LLB, Blackstone School of Law

Jonathan P Breazeale, PHD, Associate Professor of Finance, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, Texas AM University; MBA, Millsaps College; BS, United States Military Academy

Mary C Funck, PHD, Assistant Professor of Finance, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, Univ of Mississippi; MBA, Western Illinois University; MS, Western Illinois University; BS, Western Illinois University

Jose Antonio Gutierrez, PHD, Associate Professor of Finance, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, Univ of Texas-San Antonio; MS, Univ of Texas-San Antonio; BBA, Univ of Texas-San Antonio

Kathy Hill, PHD, Associate Professor of Business Administration, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, Univ of Oklahoma-Norman; MBE, Univ of Oklahoma-Norman; BA, Oklahoma Baptist University

Geraldine Hynes, PHD, Professor of Business Administration, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, St Louis University; AM, Univ of Illinois-Urbana; AB, Univ of Illinois-Chicago

Kurt R Jesswein, PHD, Associate Professor of Finance; Associate Dean of COBA, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, Univ of S Carolina-Columbia; MIB, Univ of S Carolina-Columbia; BBA, Univ of Wisconsin-Whitewater

Steve J Johnson, PHD, Associate Professor of Finance, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, Univ of Utah; MS, Univ of Nebraska-Lincoln; BA, Union College

William Hadley Leavell, DBA, Professor of Finance, Department of General Business & Finance, DBA, Louisiana Tech University; MBA, LSU AM College; BS, Louisiana Tech University

Balasundram Maniam, PHD, Professor of Finance, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, Univ of Mississippi; MBA, Arkansas State University; BS, Arkansas State University

Steve A Nenninger, PHD, Associate Professor of Finance, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, Southern Illinois U-Carbondale; MBA, Southeast Missouri State Univ; BSBA, Southeast Missouri State Univ

Kathryn S O'Neill, PHD, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, Georgia State University; MA, Georgia State University; BA, Texas Tech University

Tommy J Robertson, JD, Associate Professor and Chair of General Business and Finance, Department of General Business & Finance, JD, South Texas College of Law; BS, Texas AM University

Robert H Stretcher, PHD, Professor of Finance, Department of General Business & Finance, PHD, Univ of Tennessee-Knoxville; MBA, Univ of North Alabama; BA, Univ of Tennessee-Knoxville

Laura Louise Sullivan, JD, Associate Professor of Business Administration, Department of General Business & Finance, JD, South Texas College of Law; MBA, Sam Houston State University; BBA, Univ of Houston-Main